2016 Vermont Covered Bridge Half Marathon

My previous post I wrote about running this race for fun and that is exactly what I did. The whole weekend in itself was fun. Saturday my friend Sue and I drove to Long Trail Brewing in West Bridgewater Corners, VT where we met up with her cousin Kaye-Lani from North Carolina. We also met up with our friends Chris and Lori who moved recently from Endicott to New Hampshire and as an added bonus my friend Ian made the hour drive from his house as well to join us all for some beer, food and laughs.

Kaye-Lani had rented a rustic cabin retreat about 8 miles outside of Woodstock, VT. After lunch Sue, Kaye-Lani and I got to the cabin, settled in for a bit. Shortly we were off to the pre-race pasta dinner at the Suicide Six ski resort. The evening weather was absolutely perfect, returning back to our cabin we spent several hours enjoying the rest of the evening chatting before crashing for the night as we had an early start to our Sunday.

Sunrise was beautiful as we got ourselves dressed and ready for the days race. Once parked and ready to board our bus that would take us to the start is when the rain began to fall and it fell. It rained during the entire race, after the race and all the way home back to New York. The rain during the race did however feel great, kept the body temperature in check. I did have one issue as my sock was quite wet and was chaffing at the bottom of my right foot making it a little uncomfortable.

We began the race together and I ran the first two miles at 8:44 pace stopped for a brief bathroom break and then gradually got into a really comfortable groove for the rest of the race. I finished the half marathon in 1:41:25 finishing 188th out of 1,890 runners and I had a blast doing it.

Cold and completely soaked I found the Harpoon Brewery beer tent and celebrated appropriately. Afterwards we made a quick return to our cabin to wash up and some dry clothes before heading into Woodstock for lunch. We met back up with Chris and Lori at the Worthy Kitchen, the “Worthy” is completely worthy of your business.

After lunch is when we all would part ways ending a fun weekend with friends in Vermont.

Cheers!

Our cabin in the woods.

Our cabin in the woods.

Kaye-Lani checking out the bathtub and outhouse.

Kaye-Lani checking out the bathtub and outhouse.

Checking the place over.

Checking the place over.

A little cramped!

A little cramped!

Sunrise

Sunrise

Cabin Interior

Cabin Interior

Cabin Interior

Cabin Interior

Cabin Interior

Cabin Interior

Sue & Kaye-Lani at the pasta dinner.

Sue & Kaye-Lani at the pasta dinner.

L-R: Myself, Kaye-Lani, Lori, Chris & Sue at the Worthy Kitchen in Woodstock, VT.

L-R: Myself, Kaye-Lani, Lori, Chris & Sue at the Worthy Kitchen in Woodstock, VT.

 

 

Old Forge New York: Paddlefest

This weekend up in Old Forge is the annual Paddle Festival sponsored by http://www.mountainmanoutdoors.com

Julie had plans to head north for the day, check out some new canoes and kayaks and do a little paddling ourselves. The weather wasn’t perfect but it was warm and we had no rain. Upon arriving in Old Forge we made our way right to the waterfront where all the boats were and the test paddling was taking place. Julie quickly fell in love with a very light weight Swift Kayak http://www.swiftcanoe.com/#!adirondack-12-lt/c1wd4

This boat is beautiful and pricey so she is keeping it in mind for a future purchase. After spending time Oohing and Awing at all the beautiful products it was time to take “Elsie” off the car and hit the water ourselves.  We launched on Old Forge Pond and paddled the channel to First Lake where we would take in the views and the homes that dotted the shoreline.

A few hours later we were back on dry land and hungry. No trip to Old Forge would not be complete without a good meal at Walt’s Diner. Now that we were fed it was off to Mountain Man to see all the other cool products that were part of the weekend. There were lots more canoes and kayaks, shoes, clothing, paddles, etc. However there was one thing that caught our attention quickly, a Sylvan Sport camper http://www.sylvansport.com We absolutely loved it and are seriously considering one of these in the near future.

To finish out the day we took a ride north a few miles to Inlet, NY where we spent a little time taking in the views of Fourth, Fifth, Sixth & Seventh lakes. While stopped at Seventh Lake we bumped into an extremely friendly local resident. I didn’t notice at first but eventually I realized she was wearing a 2016 Binghamton Bridge Run shirt.

Our day was long but extremely fun and we scouted some new places to paddle on our next trip to the Adirondacks.

Cheers!

Adirondack Paddlefest Old Forge, NY. Image © Joe Geronimo

Adirondack Paddlefest Old Forge, NY. Image © Joe Geronimo

Julie and I paddle "Elsie" on First Lake in Old Forge, NY. Image © Joe Geronimo

Julie and I paddle “Elsie” on First Lake in Old Forge, NY. Image © Joe Geronimo

The Return to Long Pond:

For the first time this year I was able to finally get out in my canoe this evening. I made the 40 minute trip to Long Pond near Smithville Flats. Launching my boat I made my way down the pond. The water was placid and the surroundings quiet only to be disturbed periodically by the chorus of song birds. Looking off to my right I noticed a female Canadian goose sitting atop a mound. I instantly realized that she was with her young.

Female Canadian goose with her chicks. Image © Joe Geronimo.

Female Canadian goose with her chicks May 11th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo.

Moving on quietly the silence of Long Pond was interrupted by a fisherman hacking his brains out as I watched him return his cigarette to his mouth. I paddled into a cove on the east end only to be greeted by two more fisherman sitting along the shoreline. After a few words I was on my way again slowly paddling along the shore.

I paused for a few minutes in an attempt to photograph a Northern Flicker but it proved fruitless. Then I caught a glimpse of movement from the corner of my right eye. Slowly I turned and there I spied a beaver having some dinner. I dipped my paddle in the water and turned my boat cautiously toward him. A few soft paddle strokes to move closer. This beaver has yet to notice my presence as I ever so slightly reach for my camera. Click, click, click and he still does’t know I’m there. Click, click, click and now his attention turns to me and he disappears into the brush.

I patiently waited to see if he would return but to no avail. I returned back up the pond to the launch site feeling excited about my return to Long Pond.

Beaver having some dinner on Long Pond. Image © Joe Geronimo.

Beaver having some dinner on Long Pond May 11th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo.

Imperfection

Sunset Tupper Lake, NY September 24th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Sunset Tupper Lake, NY September 24th 2015, Image © Joe Geronimo.

On a recent morning before going to work I was reminiscing in my mind of a trip to the Adirondacks I had taken not to long ago. The trip was a memorable one to say the least. Fresh in my mind was the vivid sunset I had laid witness to while in Tupper Lake, NY that evening. I’d have to say it was one of the most breath taking I’ve seen in my lifetime.

I was fortunate to be able to make several images of that sunset during its many stages. However one image in particular I never really liked so it never made it to the editing process. Over the past several days that particular image has grown on me and I’ve found myself going back to look at it repeatedly. I finally realized what it is I have come to love about that image. Its not perfect, and neither am I or anyone else for that matter. It reinforces to me that even though we as humans are not perfect there is something to love about everyone.

Cheers!

 

Life in Boxes:

I began shooting slide film around 1990 but most of the images I made at this point were mostly captured on print film, something I regret. I didn’t really begin to convert solely to slide film until early 1992 and have been shooting it ever since. I’ll admit that in 2005 I was intrigued by the digital camera and purchased my first DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera. I enjoyed it and made some great images with it as well. I loved the instant gratification of viewing the picture immediately. I also liked the fact that outside the camera and flash card there was no additional cost of film purchase and processing. I vowed to never shoot another roll of film again.

That vow would only last about 6 months before I found myself lacking in something I craved the most. A tangible asset. I would go on to own more DSLR camera bodies as well as film bodies. I spent several years arguing the film vs. digital argument only to realize that it all boils down to preference and what your goals are. There is room in my camera bag for both film and digital.

Our world moves at the speed of now and that is why I carry a DSLR with me most of the time. News happens at a moments notice!

A passion of mine is to preserve history and I choose to do my preservation through photography. No matter the subject matter or the camera you use every click of the shutter captures a moment in time, a piece of our history and for me that is most important. Over the past 24 years I have been documenting my career mostly on film but I do have several hundred images made with a digital camera. I have also been documenting our family as well which is 90% slide film and 10% digital. Without an actual physical count I’d have to estimate my family slide collection hovers somewhere near 8,000 images of which only half have been filed. I just received another 216 slides the other day from the holidays.

Another reason I still shoot slide film is because of monetary value. Collectors want originals. I’ve sold older slides from my collection on Ebay for some serious amounts of money. As a matter of fact I know people who do it for a living. They buy slide collections and break them up. This is both sad and fascinating as well. I’ve slowly been acquiring slides that I hope to flip in the near future but only time will tell.

Since Kodak has exited the slide film market entirely there are only several choices left in which to buy it. Agfa Photo has recently restarted its slide film business and I’m glad because I love the stuff compared to Fuji’s. Its comes done to personal choice. Also Kodak does not process film anymore and most film (Print) is either processed in house at local photo labs or stores like Walmart or CVS. Slide film processing is only done at a handful of locations around the United States with the most popular being Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas.

Although those yellow Kodak boxes of joy that came in the mail are no longer I still get excited for those Red, White & Blue boxes from Dwayne’s!

Cheers!!!!!!

Twas the night before Christmas. Agfa CT Precisa 100, ©Joe Geronimo 2015.

Twas the night before Christmas. Agfa CT Precisa 100, ©Joe Geronimo 2015.

Agfa CT Precis 100 Slide Film.

Agfa CT Precis 100 Slide Film.

I just received 6 boxes of slides from Dwayne's Photo shot over the Christmas holiday. ©Joe Geronimo

I just received 6 boxes of slides from Dwayne’s Photo I shot over the Christmas holiday. ©Joe Geronimo

 

Historic Photograph:

I love history, more so if it involves historic photographs. I recently acquired a “Red Border” Kodachrome slide for my collection taken between 1950 and 1955 of the Mt. Washington Cog Railway in Bretton Woods, NH. I did a little research and discovered something I had never known. This particular locomotive was involved in a fatal accident in September 1967 in which 8 people were killed and 74 injured. I’ve taken this trip several times in my 44 years on this earth and each trip was amazing. However I’d be lying if I told you the thought of something going wrong never crossed my mind.

In this winter scene Cog Railway #3 "Agiocochook"  which was built in 1883 by the Manchester Locomotive Works is getting ready for a trip up the 6,289′ Mt. Washington.

In this winter scene Cog Railway #3 “Agiocochook” which was built in 1883 by the Manchester Locomotive Works is getting ready for its trip to the summit of the 6,289′ Mt. Washington.

Here is an account of what happened that fateful September day in 1967.

Mt. Washington, N.H. (AP) — A mountain-climbing
rail excursion car jammed with Sunday sightseers
lost its engine while backing down the historic cog track on 6,288-foot Mt. Washington and leaped into a gorge, killing eight persons and injuring at least 74.
Gov. John W. King, who rushed to the scene, ordered an immediate investigation by state Public Utilities Commission officials. The 98-year-old railroad, a popular tourist attraction on this scenic centerpiece in the White Mountain Presidential range, spans 3 1/2 miles – 3 miles on trestle.

Victims Listed.
State Police identified the victims as:
BEVERLY RICHMOND, 15, Putnam, Conn.
ERIC DAVIES, 7, Hampton, N.H.
MARY FRANK, 38, Warren, Mich.
KENT WOODWORTH, 9, New London, N.H.
SHIRLEY ZORZY, 22, Lynn, Mass.
CHARLES USHER, 55, Dover, N.H.
A 2-year-old child identified only as the “GROSS child of Brookline, Mass.”
An unidentified female was the eighth victim.
At Mary Hitchcock Hospital in Hanover, CHARLES GROSS, 31; his wife GABY, 34, and their 3-year-old daughter MELANIE, of Brookline, Mass., were undergoing treatment today. Their relationship to the dead GROSS child was not determined immediately.
Three passengers on the ill-fated car were in critical condition at the Hanover hospital. They were RICHARD LESLIE, 49, of Madison, Ohio, a skull fracture and other injuries; NORRIS BLACKBURN, 68, of Memphis, Tenn., spine and other injuries, and MRS. MARIE BUXTON, 49, of Clifton, N.J., back injury.
Most of the injured were taken first to the Littleton Hospital, where doctors put a disaster plan into operation and called all available help. Some 25 doctors and about 40 nurses worked through the night.
The injured were rushed over twisting back mountain roads to the hospitals in northern New Hampshire and Vermont.
Teams of rescue workers needed some four hours to bring the injured and the dead to a base station.
It was not immediately determined how many were in the excursion car when it broke free and rolled down 500 feet before soaring from the cog track and crashing.
The accident happened about one-third of the way down the 3 1/2 miles of track along the west side of the 6,288-foot mountain in the center of the Presidential Range of the White Mountains.
The descent is usually made at four miles an hour with the locomotive in front of the one passenger car backing down.

A passenger, Bertrand Croteau, 32, of Thornton said that when the train reached the first switch Sunday “the locomotive began to shake and just fell off the road.”
He said the passenger car began rolling free “and the brakeman tried to put on the brakes. We went about 500 feet and then we went off the tracks.”
He said he was thrown through a window and
“buried under a pile of bodies.”
Ralph Este, a technician at the transmitter on top of the mountain for WMTM-TV of Poland Springs, Maine, said the engine jumped the track at a point where there is a spur track.
He said the passenger car derailed at a shallow curve just before the track plunges down the steepest incline of the railway, a section called Jacob’s Ladder that has a grade angle of 37.41 per cent.
The passenger car was made of aluminum and reportedly was one of the railway’s newer ones.

INJURED ON MT. WASHINGTON.
Mt. Washington, N.H. (AP) — Here is a partial list of persons injured when an excursion train fell off the Cog Railway and into a gorge on Mt. Washington Sunday:
RUSTY AERTSEN, 19, of Bucks County, Pa.
FLOYD BAILEY, 40, his wife LOUISE, 41, and son KENNETH, 12, of New London, N.H.
MR. and MRS. ANTHONY BERTELLI of Haddam, Conn.
ROGER CARDIN, 47; his wife RITA, 42, and son ROGER, JR., 21, of Newmarket, N.H.
NATHANIEL CARTER, 23, of South Woodstock, N.H.
RICHARD CASPINIUS, 63, and JENNIE CASPINIUS, 60, of Falmouth, Maine.
GORDON CHASE of Lincoln, N.H.
BERTRAND CROTEAU, 32; his wife, EDMAE, 30; daughter DEBRA, 11; and son BERTRAND, JR., 6, of Thornton, N.H.
CAROL DAVIES, 9, and LORETTA DAVIES, 5, of Hampton, N.H.
EVERETT DEMERITT, 30, of Wolcott, Vt.
CAROL DORSAY, 26, of Woodstock, Vt.
JEFFREY GAINES, 2, of Rockport, Maine.
PAULINE GOTCHREAU and DAVID GOTCHREAU, 64, of Putnam, Conn.
CHARLES GROSS, GABY GROSS, 34; and MELANIE GROSS, 4, of Brookline, Mass.
GEORGE KALOCERIS, 28, of Lynn, Mass.
CHARLES KENNISON, 18, of Jefferson, N.H.
ROBERT PROVENCHAL, 31; and daughters, LINDA and SUSAN, of Biddeford, Maine.
JOHN RICHMAN, 12, of Putnam, Conn.
HAROLD ROGERS, 44; his wife FRANCIS, 34; and son DEAN, of Campton, N.H.
GRETA SCHOPE, 33, of Bridgeport, Conn.
JOSEPH VALLIERE, 59, of Methuen, Mass.
BERYL WARREN, 27, and his son PATRICK, 1, of Craftsbury, Vt.
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH LAURENDEAU and daughter LINDA, 3, of South Barre, Vt.
MR. and MRS. JAY WITMER of Roxbury, Mass.
MR. and MRS. MORRIS BLACKBURN of Memphis, Tenn.
A. RICHARD LESLIE of Madison, Ohio.
MR. and MRS. GEORGE BUXTON of Clifton, N.H.

Nashua Telegram New Hamsphire 1967-09-18

Paddling, Campfires and Gin

Myself and friend Jerry Albertie have been talking about kayaking the Delaware River for a few years now but our schedules never would cooperate. The one section that has been of interest to us is between Narrowsburg, NY and Port Jervis, NY. However from what we learned the launch at Port Jervis was closed. We would kayak 32 miles over two days exiting the river at Sparrowbush, NY instead.

Finally the weekend of July 18th & 19th our lives were uncomplicated enough where we could get out on the water. The weather was hot, hazy and humid but shortly we would find the water was nice and cool.

Shuffling cars around was a little hectic but once in place boats loaded with gear we launched from the DEC site in Narrowsburg. Our plan was to paddle half on Saturday (15 Miles) and the other half on Sunday (17 Miles). We would make camp along the Delaware in Barryville, NY at the Kittatinny campground. Just east of the launch site in Narrowsburg the river flows under a arched highway bridge and from what I have been told the depth at this point can reach over 100 feet. On a rock ledge tucked under the bridge we see about a dozen people, boats pulled up on shore and others floating to watch the show. A rope tied to the sub-frame of the bridge structure made for some awesome summer fun.

Summer fun along the Delaware River at Narrowsburg, NY July 18th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Summer fun along the Delaware River at Narrowsburg, NY July 18th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

 

A quiet and serene section of the Delaware River July 18th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

A quiet and serene section of the Delaware River July 18th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Paddling east the shoreline the lush green shoreline is dotted with homes on either side, some of those homes being very impressive. The sun was beating down making it extremely toasty. Thankfully during our days journey we would encounter several sets of rapids. These rapids were fun, soaked you enough to cool you off for a bit and added a few inches of water to your boat.

To the west the skies grew darker and the rumbling of thunder could be heard in the distance. Jerry and I were making plans for a shelter should this storm catch up to us. Thankfully we were able to keep ahead of it. At Tusten, NY we encountered a railroad bridge that stretches from New York to Pennsylvania. Beneath the bridge and continuing around the bend is a wonderful set of fast moving, heat quenching rapids. A half further is the 10 Mile River Access and a National Park Ranger station where we would beach for a break and a quick snack.

The railroad stretches from New York into Pennsylvania here at Tusten, NY July 18th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

The railroad stretches from New York into Pennsylvania here at Tusten, NY July 18th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

10 Mile River Access and National Park Ranger Station July 18th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

10 Mile River Access and National Park Ranger Station July 18th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Jerry and I beached at the "10 Mile River Access" Tusten, NY for a quick break and some food. July 18th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Jerry and I beached at the “10 Mile River Access” Tusten, NY for a quick break and some food. July 18th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Back on the water and that pesky thunderstorm still following us. skies are still growing darker to the west and seem to want to swallow us. Paddling right along, 3.5 hours later Jerry and I would reach our campsite for the night staying just ahead of the storm. Not long after getting our boats to our campsite the storm would catch us.  We decided to spend the time shuttling our cars around instead, proving to be the right decision. Thankfully we decided to hold off the campfire and dinner as a deluge of rain and lightning drenched the area.

Narrowsburg, NY looking west after a thunderstorm had passed July 18th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Narrowsburg, NY looking west after a thunderstorm had passed July 18th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Narrowsburg, NY looking east after a Thunderstorm passed. July 18th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Narrowsburg, NY looking east after a Thunderstorm passed. July 18th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Back at our campsite and cars shuttled, I get the fire started so we can begin cooking dinner. Iced in our cooler are ribeye steaks, baked potatoes and corn on the cob. For desert we have watermelon, Fig Newtons and chocolate chip cookies. Now for an adult beverage or two. The fire is crackling away, the lime is squeezed, glass is iced and the gin and tonic poured. Jerry and I are now resting comfortably in our chairs next to the fire as we chatter about the day and what is in store for tomorrow.

Awake at 6:30AM Jerry and I begin the days preparations. A quick breakfast and another shuttling of cars. We are on the water by 9:00AM under glorious sunshine and another day of scorching heat. 17 miles ahead of us and many rapids to cool us off. Today would be a bit more entertaining than yesterday. The endless parade of rafts, kayaks, canoes and tubes would ply this section of the Delaware River from countless camping and rafting outfits along its shores. Most of them all liquored up by 9AM or so. We watched and laughed as the comedy show progressed.

One of the hundreds of flotilla's along the Delaware on July 19th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

One of the hundreds of flotilla’s along the Delaware on July 19th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Moving on the water was very placid but a little faster moving than yesterday. Jerry calls out to me look an eagle off to your right. Sure enough a Bald Eagle was sitting on the fallen tree along the river’s edge. Slowly and quietly Jerry and I approach. Surprisingly the eagle hasn’t taken off yet. We were able to get a few images before its graceful departure.

Bald Eagle along the Delaware River July 19th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Bald Eagle along the Delaware River July 19th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Bald Eagle along the Delaware River July 19th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Bald Eagle along the Delaware River July 19th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Sections of the Delaware still had fog from the early morning as we approached two men and a dog fishing from a boat. Quietly we snuck up on them before they even noticed we were there. A friendly hello and we continued on. Shortly after Jerry had a fan club. A group of ducks were hoping that Jerry made them breakfast as they followed his every move. This is typical Jerry attracting all types!

This 17 mile section of river had many more rapids than yesterday, one of my favorites was called “Staircase Rapids” just east of Pond Eddy, NY. It sounded intimidating but was more mild than the name perceived, a decent soaker at best. Then there was “Mongaup Rapids” my favorite. I got pretty soaked on this one, bounced off a few rocks, managed to stay upright, so much fun.

 

Early morning tranquility right after we launched  July 19th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Early morning tranquility right after we launched July 19th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

 

Passing one of the many campsites along the Delaware River July 19th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Passing one of the many campsites along the Delaware River July 19th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Fishermen along the Delaware River July 19th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Fishermen along the Delaware River July 19th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

 

Jerry's fan club hoping for some food. July 19th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Jerry’s fan club hoping for some food. July 19th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

 

Jerry Albertie 'groupies" coming for the paparazzi. July 19th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo

Jerry Albertie ‘groupies” coming for the paparazzi. July 19th 2015.
Image © Joe Geronimo

Here is a photo by Kittatinny Canoes of Mongaup Rapids. Image © Kittatinnyy Canoe

Here is a photo by Kittatinny Canoes of Mongaup Rapids.
Image © Kittatinnyy Canoe

Approaching our last mile or so of our trip, a completion of a 32 mile two day kayak trip would not be without task. We would first have to shoot the rapids at Mill Rift, duck under a massive railroad bridge navigate a smaller set of rapids to the east of the bridge where we would reach the beachhead. This section of river recently made the news on July 7th when the Mill Rift Fire Department had to rescue 12 people in two separate incidents minutes apart. You can read the story by following the link below.

This was a wonderful trip, Jerry and I are now talking about doing another trip next summer between Hancock, NY and Long Eddy about 25 miles.

http://www.recordonline.com/article/20150707/NEWS/150709565