The Rehydration Test

Last week I posted about my first attempt at dehydrating meals for backpacking and canoe camping. I went out this afternoon in order to test the meal. I wanted to see if I could gauge how much water and time I would need to properly rehydrate the 6 ounces of sausage vegetable stew.

You can check out the results in a short video below! Give my blog a follow, you can also find me “Adirondack Joe” on Facebook & Instagram as well.

If you like what you see you can find the recipe in the link to my original post here: https://adirondackjoe.com/2019/03/08/this-is-a-test-and-only-a-test/

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A Whiteface Revisit

July 15th 2015 Michael and I summited Whiteface Mountain in New York’s Adirondack Park. To date it is our only high peak, however we hope to change that this year conquering another.

Our day started out rainy but like they say wait 10 minutes and it will change. We were treated with a glorious day for hiking and once reaching the summit we decided to change things up a bit. Choosing the road more traveled Michael and I hiked down the auto road instead, continuing to drink in those stunning views.

Cheers!

The Journey Begins

Jenneken’s Junction on the East Service Road in Hillcrest, NY (Former Nelson Ellis Furniture Store) will become “Your Needful Things” today.

Your Needful Things is a 5,000+ square foot multi-vendor shop with wares of all sorts. There is even a fabric reupholstery business located there as well. Last month I took a chance at what I believe will be a successful venue as it evolves and grows.  I currently lease wall space in the hallway leading to Phil’s Gift Shop a Binghamton institution.

There will be a grand re-opening celebration come April and I will post updates as the specifics become available. However in the meantime take a ride and see for yourself.

Current store hours:

Wednesdays 10:00am to 5:00pm, Thursdays 10:00am to 6:00pm, Fridays 10:00am to 5:00pm, Saturdays 10:00am to 5:00pm & Sundays 11:00am to 4:00pm

New Adventures

This coming April will mark 27 years at my job and I’m hoping to retire once I hit 30 years. A long time ago I went to school for Advertising Art & Design and received a 2 year certificate. I was all convinced this was the career path I wanted. I worked in small ad agencies long before computers did the work and I began attending a SUNY college here in New York taking business classes.

Things changed rather abruptly when suddenly I had the opportunity to hire on the railroad. I dropped the arts like a hot potato. My passion for art in its many forms lay dormant like a bear in winter hibernation waiting for the right time to leave its slumber.

Back in the mid 2000’s I was laying i my hotel room watching TV when I saw an interview with a woman named Diana Walker. She had just written a book called “Public & Private” 20 years of photographing the Presidency. When I got back home I went to my local bookstore and purchased her book and immediately I was hooked. Then I got this crazy notion I wanted to be a photojournalist, and in 2007 that dream became a reality when I was hired by our local newspaper (A Gannett Rag) as a part time staff photographer working four days a week. To be honest I couldn’t believe they hired me. I spent about a year there when I saw the writing on the wall with layoffs. I despise being fired for something I did not do, so I resigned. Almost immediately I was handed a freelance contract and now I was working for the paper on my own terms.

I would spend the next few years shooting for the paper and small assignments for the Associated Press. On a whim I threw out an email to the PBA (Professional Bowlers Assoction) and sure enough they began having me shoot several events in the northeast for a few years. One of my favorites was an outdoor match at Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson, NJ. I also landed a few years of work with NYSUT (New York State United Teachers) union. I was having fun! All while working my job on the railroad.

I haven’t been doing much freelance work these days. Over the past three years I have been shooting running race photos here in New York and Vermont. I like it and it fits well into my schedule.

Recently a friend of mine purchased a multi vendor store and talked me into leasing wall space to sell some of my work. I also just opened and Etsy shop as well. I hope to slowly build both into a small business to keep me occupied after I retire.

With that said I encourage you to visit my Etsy shop, like and share it with friends and family. It is definitely a work in progress as I try to navigate the ins and outs.

Cheers,

Joe

Review: Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove

It is no secret that I love gear, so when I came across this Uberleben Stoker flatpack stove I knew I had to give it a try. I already own a Solostove Lite which I love. In my opinion you can’t have too many twig stoves.

This afternoon I headed to my local State Park to get it’s fire burning and have some food. Conditions out on the trail aren’t always perfect and today’s weather I feel was a good representative of that. The temperature a balmy 38 degrees in addition to 15-17MPH winds and snow flurries thrown in for good measure. It has been very damp and wet here lately so in order to get the fire going I decided to bring some dryer lint and two small pieces of fat wood and in no time the belly of this beast had come alive.

I filled my pot with 12 ounces of cold water and placed it on top. I continued to feed the fire a steady diet of leaves, twigs and sticks. The one thing I have noticed with these twigs stoves is they are constantly hungry. In these conditions it took 15 minutes for the 12 ounces of water to boil which I felt was reasonable. On a warm day with light wind I’m confident boiling time would be around 8-9 minutes.

I poured the water into a Goodto-Go single serve dehydrated meal (Chicken Gumbo) stirred and sealed and let rehydrate for 15 minutes. I put another 12 ounces of water back into my pot in order to boil for coffee.

The Stove: A little on the heavy side (14.5 ounces with canvas sleeve), this extremely compact and simple 5 panel stove assembles in about a minute or so. The first time I put it together it felt a little clumsy to me and I was skeptical that it would be as sturdy as I have read. All the pieces fit snug together giving it a solid base. This stove is made from heavy duty 304 grade stainless steel which is anti-corrosive.  After I had it assembled I truly liked its feel, solid as a tank. You will have no issue what so ever placing a heavy cast iron skillet or pot on this stove. Another great feature about this product was the large opening to feed the fire and the nicely placed holes for consistent airflow.

What I Liked:

Ease of assembly, compact, large opening to feed the fire, Sturdiness, airflow and lastly the price.

What I Didn’t Like:

A little heavier than I would like and extremely sooty during disassembly.

I believe that the positives outweigh the negatives and highly recommend this compact, affordable twig stove. I hope this review of the Uberleben Stoker Flatpack Stove was helpful and if you have a product that you would like me to review please feel free to contact me.

Cheers!

Compact & flat the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove comes in this nice canvas sleeve. ©Joe Geronimo
All the parts of the very compact easy to assemble Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove. © Joe Geronimo
Completely assembled the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove is extremely sturdy. ©Joe Geronimo

 

The belly of the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove is alive with fire. ©Joe Geronimo

 

12 ounces of water working itself to a boil atop of the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove. ©Joe Geronimo

 

15 minutes later we have boiling water atop of the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove. ©Joe Geronimo

 

Goodto-Go chicken gumbo and a hot cup of coffee on cold and windy winter afternoon. ©Joe Geronimo

A Kodachrome Evening

It was August 2009 and we were vacationing in western Maine at the Sunday River Resort in Newry. A spectacular evening was upon us as we had just finished dinner and the boys wanted to go fishing, driving a few miles east to North and South ponds in Greenwood. Locals had told us that fishing from Johnny Bridge Road was good, so here we stood. The boys were becoming professional weed fisherman and dad an expert lure changer. Another cast another clump of weeds. Well when they reeled up this clump it began to move only to reveal a small mouth bass. To say Michael & Max were ecstatic would be a slight under statement. It would be the perfect ending to a beautiful evening with my boys.

Max & Michael Greenwood, ME August 2009. Kodachrome 64, © Joe Geronimo.

A Beacon of Light

This past weekend Julie, the boys and I made a quick overnight trip to Long Island to visit family. Every time I visit which isn’t all that much I am quickly reminded as to why I left, the traffic is disgusting. However there is one bright beacon of light we do enjoy, Fire Island Lighthouse and National Seashore.

Cruising the Ocean Parkway is another favorite of ours. It is several miles out of our way but surely makes up for it in beauty and lack of heavy traffic. Pulling into parking field #5 before arriving at my sister’s home we found it surprisingly uncrowded for a Saturday. It was quite windy along the shore making it feel as if we were in a sand blaster. Undeterred we hiked around for about an hour or so taking in the sights, sounds and smell of the ocean, we had a wonderful time. Next visit we hope to alot more time in order to hike to Kismet, Saltaire and Fair Harbor.

Cheers!

Julie & I at Fire Island Light and National Seashore July 21st 2018. © Joe Geronimo
A beacon of light, Fire Island Light stands proud along the Atlantic Ocean July 21st 2018. © Joe Geronimo