Falling in Love

Recently I purchased two new canoes from the Adirondack Canoe Company of Minerva, NY. Their “Boreas” canoe is a hybrid which can either be built as a pack canoe or a traditional solo canoe. The Boreas is 14′ long, weighs only 27 pounds and is built using a blend of carbon fiber and kevlar. Her gunwales and thwarts are hand crafted from Ash as well.

I’m a pack canoe guy but there was just something intriguing or even romantic about the solo canoe. I’ve never paddled a true solo and let me just say there was a little of a learning curve for me. I’m slowly getting the hang of it but I definitely still need to work on my paddle strokes and even my entrance and exit.

I love how this boat glides effortlessly through the water with each stroke but at the same time seems to slow life down a little. In truth I’ve only been at this for two weeks practicing on our families small lake in Pennsylvania. Come mid July I hope to take the Boreas on a trip along the west branch of the Sacandaga river and into Good Luck lake in the eastern Adirondacks.

If you like this video please by all means share with family and friends, cheers!

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Rail Trail Cycling

After work on Tuesday I walked 4 miles on the rail trail and my knee felt sore and irritated. Yesterday I thought why not take my bike off the trainer and ride the trail instead. I’m not a huge fan of cycling, its a huge time suck. However it does have its benefits.

It was cool and sunny with a strong westerly headwind but felt great to be outdoors. I started at the western most end of the trail cycling the 3.5 miles to the eastern end. I would do 3 complete laps for a total of 22 miles rounding up in the neighborhood before finishing. This also showed me how seriously out of shape I truly am as this was the most amount of exercise/effort I’ve done since getting injured back in December. My knee felt great though and I got a nice cardio workout as well.

I’m planning on returning to the rail trail tomorrow morning for 16 miles before meeting friends for coffee. My bike is old probably close to 30 years but it gets the job done. Maybe next year I’ll replace it with a new one???

Cheers!

The western side of the Vestal Rail Trail crosses Choconut Creek.
The Choconut creek flows towards the Susquehanna river.
Back where I began at the western end of the Rail Trail.
My stats for the day…..

The Rehydration Test

Last week I posted about my first attempt at dehydrating meals for backpacking and canoe camping. I went out this afternoon in order to test the meal. I wanted to see if I could gauge how much water and time I would need to properly rehydrate the 6 ounces of sausage vegetable stew.

You can check out the results in a short video below! Give my blog a follow, you can also find me “Adirondack Joe” on Facebook & Instagram as well.

If you like what you see you can find the recipe in the link to my original post here: https://adirondackjoe.com/2019/03/08/this-is-a-test-and-only-a-test/

Passion Built In

It is not very often we get to pursue our passion in life. For me my passion lies in the love of the outdoors, especially canoeing. Today I couldn’t be more excited, proud and more than anything humbled to announce that I am now a representative of the Adirondack Canoe Company.

Born inside the blue line the Adirondack Canoe Company’s passion is built into every lightweight canoe they offer. Boat builders Chad Smith and Simon Gardner bring to the workshop 25 years of boat building experience, they are true craftsmen in every sense of the word. But they don’t just build boats, they also craft relationships.

If you are looking for stunning craftsmanship at an affordable price look no further than the Adirondack Canoe Company. And when it’s time for your next adventure let’s build it together.

Visit us: http://adirondackcanoecompany.com/index.html

Our Boats: 

Haystack: 10′ 6″ weighing only 19 pounds.

Skylight: 12′ weighing only 20 pounds.

Boreas: 14′ in either a pack style 24 pounds or a traditional solo canoe (hung seat) 27 pounds.

Tamarack: 16′ 45 pound tandem canoe.

Standard layup is a blend of carbon fiber and kevlar. Please inquire about other color combinations and materials that are available.

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14′ Boreas in a Pack Style (left) and traditional solo canoe (right)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review: Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove

It is no secret that I love gear, so when I came across this Uberleben Stoker flatpack stove I knew I had to give it a try. I already own a Solostove Lite which I love. In my opinion you can’t have too many twig stoves.

This afternoon I headed to my local State Park to get it’s fire burning and have some food. Conditions out on the trail aren’t always perfect and today’s weather I feel was a good representative of that. The temperature a balmy 38 degrees in addition to 15-17MPH winds and snow flurries thrown in for good measure. It has been very damp and wet here lately so in order to get the fire going I decided to bring some dryer lint and two small pieces of fat wood and in no time the belly of this beast had come alive.

I filled my pot with 12 ounces of cold water and placed it on top. I continued to feed the fire a steady diet of leaves, twigs and sticks. The one thing I have noticed with these twigs stoves is they are constantly hungry. In these conditions it took 15 minutes for the 12 ounces of water to boil which I felt was reasonable. On a warm day with light wind I’m confident boiling time would be around 8-9 minutes.

I poured the water into a Goodto-Go single serve dehydrated meal (Chicken Gumbo) stirred and sealed and let rehydrate for 15 minutes. I put another 12 ounces of water back into my pot in order to boil for coffee.

The Stove: A little on the heavy side (14.5 ounces with canvas sleeve), this extremely compact and simple 5 panel stove assembles in about a minute or so. The first time I put it together it felt a little clumsy to me and I was skeptical that it would be as sturdy as I have read. All the pieces fit snug together giving it a solid base. This stove is made from heavy duty 304 grade stainless steel which is anti-corrosive.  After I had it assembled I truly liked its feel, solid as a tank. You will have no issue what so ever placing a heavy cast iron skillet or pot on this stove. Another great feature about this product was the large opening to feed the fire and the nicely placed holes for consistent airflow.

What I Liked:

Ease of assembly, compact, large opening to feed the fire, Sturdiness, airflow and lastly the price.

What I Didn’t Like:

A little heavier than I would like and extremely sooty during disassembly.

I believe that the positives outweigh the negatives and highly recommend this compact, affordable twig stove. I hope this review of the Uberleben Stoker Flatpack Stove was helpful and if you have a product that you would like me to review please feel free to contact me.

Cheers!

Compact & flat the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove comes in this nice canvas sleeve. ©Joe Geronimo
All the parts of the very compact easy to assemble Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove. © Joe Geronimo
Completely assembled the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove is extremely sturdy. ©Joe Geronimo

 

The belly of the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove is alive with fire. ©Joe Geronimo

 

12 ounces of water working itself to a boil atop of the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove. ©Joe Geronimo

 

15 minutes later we have boiling water atop of the Überleben Stöker Flatpack Stove. ©Joe Geronimo

 

Goodto-Go chicken gumbo and a hot cup of coffee on cold and windy winter afternoon. ©Joe Geronimo

Lunch at State Park

The temperature is a balmy 39 degrees right now with filtered sunshine, a perfect time to head for State Park and enjoy lunch and a hot cup of coffee.

I attempted this on Wednesday but struggled to keep the fire in my twig stove going. Everything has been so damp and wet lately. However today was a success and the embers were glowing with a vibrant autumn orange.

Lastly check my authentic Lake Placid 1980 Winter Olympic knit hat….

Cheers!