A Kodachrome Evening

It was August 2009 and we were vacationing in western Maine at the Sunday River Resort in Newry. A spectacular evening was upon us as we had just finished dinner and the boys wanted to go fishing, driving a few miles east to North and South ponds in Greenwood. Locals had told us that fishing from Johnny Bridge Road was good, so here we stood. The boys were becoming professional weed fisherman and dad an expert lure changer. Another cast another clump of weeds. Well when they reeled up this clump it began to move only to reveal a small mouth bass. To say Michael & Max were ecstatic would be a slight under statement. It would be the perfect ending to a beautiful evening with my boys.

Max & Michael Greenwood, ME August 2009. Kodachrome 64, © Joe Geronimo.

Life on Film & Digital Media: Whitefish Point

Growing up I had the Atlantic Ocean less than twenty miles away and the Long Island Sound a mile away and I’ve never been a beach person. However living so close to these beautiful waters the one thing that has always intrigued me are “Lighthouses”. There is something very romantic yet mysterious about a lighthouse and their keepers.

This past summer we had the opportunity to visit the Upper Peninsula of Michigan along Lake Superior. We found ourselves at Whitefish Point 73 miles northwest of Sault Ste. Marie, MI and the impressive Soo Locks. At Whitefish Point you have the Great Lakes Ship Wreck Museum and the extremely cool Whitefish Point Light Station.

At this point in our trip I was having a camera crisis of Biblical proportion. I had run out of film for one of my cameras and ordered more. The camera shop in New York City did not ship my order promptly and I never received the film. No biggie I thought to myself I have my digital camera so I’m all set. We get all the way to the Soo Locks and I’m just as excited as a kid on Christmas morning. Grabing my camera from the camera bag I turn it on, I compose my very first image of the largest lake freighter to sail the Great Lakes entering the locks. I depress the shutter release and the earth suddenly has come to a screeching halt. There it was in digital text, the dreaded Canon Error 33 message, my shutter had failed! East has now become west, up was now down and to say I was pissed is the understatement of the 21st century. Two cameras and none were functioning. If I had to submit to a blood pressure test at this point they would have admitted me. I resorted to using my cell phone and we eventually we went to lunch. After lunch I calmed down just a tiny bit but was still steaming. Getting ready to leave Sault Ste. Marie and thinking desperate times require desperate measures. As a last ditch effort I ran into one of the gift shops hoping the camera Gods would be merciful on me. Sure enough sitting on the counter of the gift shop was a Polaroid disposable camera. I Forked over the $8.00 feeling like I had just won a major award and literally ran out the door. We were now on our way to Whitefish Point. http://www.shipwreckmuseum.com

Whitefish Point Light Station, Whitefish Point, MI July 19th 2016. © Joe Geronimo
Whitefish Point Light Station, Whitefish Point, MI July 19th 2016. © Joe Geronimo
We invite you to experience a night or two at historic Whitefish Point, home to the oldest active lighthouse on Lake Superior’s Shipwreck Coast. This is the original U.S. Coast Guard barracks building, constructed in 1923 for the Whitefish Point Lifeboat Rescue Station. It has been meticulously restored by the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society with assistance from Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs and the Michigan Department of Transportation. July 19th 2016, © Joe Geronimo
Michael & Max getting their feet wet in the cold waters of Lake Superior. Whitefish Point, MI July 19th 2016. © Joe Geronimo

The Chicago “L”

I made my first visit to the Windy City back in July. My wife and sons have already spent time here before so this was unchartered territory for me. We were staying with family in one of the suburbs of Chicago and rode the Metra into the city the several days we were there. We navigated the city by either walking or riding the subway which is affectionately knows as the “L”. Riding the “L” opened up a whole new perspective on photography for me. I instantly fell in love with the intricate infrastructure cramped between towering buildings, parking garages and everyday life below. The photographic possibilities are endless and all you need is time.

Prior to my arrival in Chicago I had done absolutely no research on this gem so I was totally in the dark as to the “Prime” locations in which to photograph. The day I made the most of my images started off bright and sunny with weather conditions crumbling like an old building as the day progressed. I believe I have created several images that convey mood, as most of these were grab shots. I particularly like the ones where I was shooting out the front window as we rode the “L”. I shot color slide film but really liked them even more converted to black & white.

The other day I had mentioned to my wife how we need to return so I can spend a good 3-4 days photographing the “L” now that I have done my research.

Cheers!

Waiting at the interlocking of Lake 7 Wells on the Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Lighting conditions were horrid and I was down to 1/60th @ F2.8, but I love the mood of this image. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
Waiting at the interlocking of Lake & Wells on the Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Lighting conditions were horrid and I was down to 1/60th @ F2.8, but I love the mood of this image. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo.
The Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo.
The Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. You can notice walking ahead is Julie, Michael & Max. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. You can notice walking ahead is Julie, Michael & Max. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo

 

The Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago "L" at Lake & Wells July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo. I would later discover that this is one of the most photographed sections due to its intricate design and track work here. I recently bid on a 1982 Kodachrome form this location and lost as it sold for $41.00.
The Chicago “L” at Lake & Wells July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo. I would later discover that this is one of the most photographed sections due to its intricate design and track work here. I recently bid on a 1982 Kodachrome from this location and lost as it sold for $41.00.
Adams & Wabash station Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
Adams & Wabash station Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo

 

The Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo

Here you’ll find a link to an image from Lake & Wells on the Chicago “L”. It was photographed from either a parking garage or rooftop. However it gives you the perspective of its complexity. I love it! https://flic.kr/p/rUyXih

A Short Susquehanna Sojourn

As we watch the colors of Autumn slowly fade into the grays of Winter I find myself taking advantage of every opportunity to be out on the water. Undeterred by the mornings brisk temperatures I decided to launch on the Susquehanna river along Conklin Ave yesterday. Paddling my way west under cloudy skies towards the “Rock Bottom” Dam I lay witness to the remaining pops of color grasping our hillsides. On my way back the wind would let me know who was in charge and the sun randomly checked on me the closer I got to my destination.

Back in my car it was time for some coffee at my favorite place, LaVeggio Roasteria

GPS: https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/1422611379

Along the Susquehanna river Binghamton, NY October 26th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Along the Susquehanna river Binghamton, NY October 26th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
The former Crowley's Milk plant and approaching "Rock Bottom" dam along the Susquehanna river Binghamton, NY October 26th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
The former Crowley’s Milk plant and approaching “Rock Bottom” dam along the Susquehanna river Binghamton, NY October 26th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Crossing under the railroad tracks the Binghamton Psychiatric Center is visible on the hilltop October 26th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Crossing under the railroad tracks the Binghamton Psychiatric Center is visible on the hilltop October 26th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Back on dry land and ready for some coffee Binghamton, NY October 26th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Back on dry land and ready for some coffee Binghamton, NY October 26th 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo

Flying High on the Ti

This morning a friend and I launched our kayaks from Hiawatha Landing in Blodgett Mills, NY. Don’t blink because you’ll drive right by this very small town nestled a few miles south of Cortland. Heavy rains over the past two days rapidly brought the water levels up in the Tioughnioga river. The USGS stream gauge at Corltand, NY on October 20th was at 3 feet and this morning the gauge was up at 5 feet. The river was flowing fast turning a rather slow trip into a quick one. The weather was cool and slightly windy as we paddled through some nice riffles and dodging a few strainers along the way making this a really fun adventure. I noted quite a bit of color loss due to the storms the over the past few days but there was enough to gawk at. In theory this trip of 11 miles would take close to 4 hours under normal conditions, however today we flew completing it in 1:48.

I love to be out on the water most anytime but Autumn by far is my favorite. I hope to be able to keep at it until at least mid-late November. Hopefully Mother Nature will oblige!

Check my GPS of the trip: https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/1417726350

Getting ready to start our journey at Hiawatha Landing in Blodgett Mills, NY October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Getting ready to start our journey at Hiawatha Landing in Blodgett Mills, NY October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Warren and I near Messengerville, NY October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Warren and I near Messengerville, NY October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo

 

Warren & I near Messengerville, NY October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Warren & I near Messengerville, NY October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Warren on the Tioughnioga river October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Warren on the Tioughnioga river October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Flying high on the Ti near Marathon, NY October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Flying high on the Ti near Marathon, NY October 23rd 2016. Image © Joe Geronimo
Myself at the take out Marathon, NY October 23rd 2016.
Myself at the take out Marathon, NY October 23rd 2016.
Warren loading our boats for the trip back to my car, October 23rd 2016 Marathon, NY. Image © Joe Geronimo
Warren loading our boats for the trip back to my car, October 23rd 2016 Marathon, NY. Image © Joe Geronimo

Postcards from the Road

We recently have just come off our summer vacation. I think this was one of my favorite vacations to date. We rarely get the opportunity to visit with Julie’s family as they live far away. Rather than blah, blah, blah about what we did while on vacation I’m going with a different approach. I think you’ll be able to travel right along with us via postcards from our 2,737 mile journey. So buckle up and enjoy the ride!

Cheers………..

July 10th-13th:

And we didn't even shoot our eye out!
And we didn’t even shoot our eye out!

Postcard Toledo

July 13th-16th:

28217459350_a1078bf219_z 28217461350_a82463c409_z 28468816516_814940bd35_z 28469929546_4cd6e01676_z

July 16th-20th:

24538872832_51fbd91d78_z 28010469824_095cac45ab_z 28395692982_d8ddd19c88_z 28441036461_9e7423d045_z 28469926336_4ae6d41b2a_z 28501787605_407022e30b_z 28520187776_7090c67735_z 28662661055_81472ddeca_z 28662665525_7102e2a446_z Postcard Round Island Lighthouse

July 20th-21st:

Postcard Bronners Postcard Toledo

Spring has Arrived: In Theory

The calendar claims Spring has arrived, however the mercury and Mother Nature aren’t quite so convinced. To say I have cabin fever is an understatement. This morning I looked at the extended forecast only to have my hopes thwarted once again. The weather just looks terrible for the foreseeable future or at least the next 7 days.

I’m longing for the warmth of the sun, the coolness of the water and the ever quiet glide of my canoe. I hope to visit a few more remote ponds and lakes in the Adirondacks this year, return to some of my favorite places in New England but most importantly spend some quality time just paddling by myself or with my family.

Here is to hoping Spring actually does arrive.

Paddling in northern New Hampshire in one of my favorite canoes "The Old Town Pack". In 2015 I sold this light weight canoe for an even lighter weight Hornbeck canoe which weighs a total of 17 lbs.
“2014” Paddling in northern New Hampshire in one of my favorite canoes “The Old Town Pack”. In 2015 I sold this light weight canoe 33 lbs for an even lighter weight Hornbeck canoe which weighs a total of 17 lbs. I also went with a light weight carbon fiber Werner “Cyprus” paddle that only weights 23.25 oz. Photo by: Ian Clark.

Life in Boxes:

I began shooting slide film around 1990 but most of the images I made at this point were mostly captured on print film, something I regret. I didn’t really begin to convert solely to slide film until early 1992 and have been shooting it ever since. I’ll admit that in 2005 I was intrigued by the digital camera and purchased my first DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera. I enjoyed it and made some great images with it as well. I loved the instant gratification of viewing the picture immediately. I also liked the fact that outside the camera and flash card there was no additional cost of film purchase and processing. I vowed to never shoot another roll of film again.

That vow would only last about 6 months before I found myself lacking in something I craved the most. A tangible asset. I would go on to own more DSLR camera bodies as well as film bodies. I spent several years arguing the film vs. digital argument only to realize that it all boils down to preference and what your goals are. There is room in my camera bag for both film and digital.

Our world moves at the speed of now and that is why I carry a DSLR with me most of the time. News happens at a moments notice!

A passion of mine is to preserve history and I choose to do my preservation through photography. No matter the subject matter or the camera you use every click of the shutter captures a moment in time, a piece of our history and for me that is most important. Over the past 24 years I have been documenting my career mostly on film but I do have several hundred images made with a digital camera. I have also been documenting our family as well which is 90% slide film and 10% digital. Without an actual physical count I’d have to estimate my family slide collection hovers somewhere near 8,000 images of which only half have been filed. I just received another 216 slides the other day from the holidays.

Another reason I still shoot slide film is because of monetary value. Collectors want originals. I’ve sold older slides from my collection on Ebay for some serious amounts of money. As a matter of fact I know people who do it for a living. They buy slide collections and break them up. This is both sad and fascinating as well. I’ve slowly been acquiring slides that I hope to flip in the near future but only time will tell.

Since Kodak has exited the slide film market entirely there are only several choices left in which to buy it. Agfa Photo has recently restarted its slide film business and I’m glad because I love the stuff compared to Fuji’s. Its comes done to personal choice. Also Kodak does not process film anymore and most film (Print) is either processed in house at local photo labs or stores like Walmart or CVS. Slide film processing is only done at a handful of locations around the United States with the most popular being Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas.

Although those yellow Kodak boxes of joy that came in the mail are no longer I still get excited for those Red, White & Blue boxes from Dwayne’s!

Cheers!!!!!!

Twas the night before Christmas. Agfa CT Precisa 100, ©Joe Geronimo 2015.
Twas the night before Christmas. Agfa CT Precisa 100, ©Joe Geronimo 2015.
Agfa CT Precis 100 Slide Film.
Agfa CT Precis 100 Slide Film.
I just received 6 boxes of slides from Dwayne's Photo shot over the Christmas holiday. ©Joe Geronimo
I just received 6 boxes of slides from Dwayne’s Photo I shot over the Christmas holiday. ©Joe Geronimo

 

Historic Photograph:

I love history, more so if it involves historic photographs. I recently acquired a “Red Border” Kodachrome slide for my collection taken between 1950 and 1955 of the Mt. Washington Cog Railway in Bretton Woods, NH. I did a little research and discovered something I had never known. This particular locomotive was involved in a fatal accident in September 1967 in which 8 people were killed and 74 injured. I’ve taken this trip several times in my 44 years on this earth and each trip was amazing. However I’d be lying if I told you the thought of something going wrong never crossed my mind.

In this winter scene Cog Railway #3 "Agiocochook"  which was built in 1883 by the Manchester Locomotive Works is getting ready for a trip up the 6,289′ Mt. Washington.
In this winter scene Cog Railway #3 “Agiocochook” which was built in 1883 by the Manchester Locomotive Works is getting ready for its trip to the summit of the 6,289′ Mt. Washington.

Here is an account of what happened that fateful September day in 1967.

Mt. Washington, N.H. (AP) — A mountain-climbing
rail excursion car jammed with Sunday sightseers
lost its engine while backing down the historic cog track on 6,288-foot Mt. Washington and leaped into a gorge, killing eight persons and injuring at least 74.
Gov. John W. King, who rushed to the scene, ordered an immediate investigation by state Public Utilities Commission officials. The 98-year-old railroad, a popular tourist attraction on this scenic centerpiece in the White Mountain Presidential range, spans 3 1/2 miles – 3 miles on trestle.

Victims Listed.
State Police identified the victims as:
BEVERLY RICHMOND, 15, Putnam, Conn.
ERIC DAVIES, 7, Hampton, N.H.
MARY FRANK, 38, Warren, Mich.
KENT WOODWORTH, 9, New London, N.H.
SHIRLEY ZORZY, 22, Lynn, Mass.
CHARLES USHER, 55, Dover, N.H.
A 2-year-old child identified only as the “GROSS child of Brookline, Mass.”
An unidentified female was the eighth victim.
At Mary Hitchcock Hospital in Hanover, CHARLES GROSS, 31; his wife GABY, 34, and their 3-year-old daughter MELANIE, of Brookline, Mass., were undergoing treatment today. Their relationship to the dead GROSS child was not determined immediately.
Three passengers on the ill-fated car were in critical condition at the Hanover hospital. They were RICHARD LESLIE, 49, of Madison, Ohio, a skull fracture and other injuries; NORRIS BLACKBURN, 68, of Memphis, Tenn., spine and other injuries, and MRS. MARIE BUXTON, 49, of Clifton, N.J., back injury.
Most of the injured were taken first to the Littleton Hospital, where doctors put a disaster plan into operation and called all available help. Some 25 doctors and about 40 nurses worked through the night.
The injured were rushed over twisting back mountain roads to the hospitals in northern New Hampshire and Vermont.
Teams of rescue workers needed some four hours to bring the injured and the dead to a base station.
It was not immediately determined how many were in the excursion car when it broke free and rolled down 500 feet before soaring from the cog track and crashing.
The accident happened about one-third of the way down the 3 1/2 miles of track along the west side of the 6,288-foot mountain in the center of the Presidential Range of the White Mountains.
The descent is usually made at four miles an hour with the locomotive in front of the one passenger car backing down.

A passenger, Bertrand Croteau, 32, of Thornton said that when the train reached the first switch Sunday “the locomotive began to shake and just fell off the road.”
He said the passenger car began rolling free “and the brakeman tried to put on the brakes. We went about 500 feet and then we went off the tracks.”
He said he was thrown through a window and
“buried under a pile of bodies.”
Ralph Este, a technician at the transmitter on top of the mountain for WMTM-TV of Poland Springs, Maine, said the engine jumped the track at a point where there is a spur track.
He said the passenger car derailed at a shallow curve just before the track plunges down the steepest incline of the railway, a section called Jacob’s Ladder that has a grade angle of 37.41 per cent.
The passenger car was made of aluminum and reportedly was one of the railway’s newer ones.

INJURED ON MT. WASHINGTON.
Mt. Washington, N.H. (AP) — Here is a partial list of persons injured when an excursion train fell off the Cog Railway and into a gorge on Mt. Washington Sunday:
RUSTY AERTSEN, 19, of Bucks County, Pa.
FLOYD BAILEY, 40, his wife LOUISE, 41, and son KENNETH, 12, of New London, N.H.
MR. and MRS. ANTHONY BERTELLI of Haddam, Conn.
ROGER CARDIN, 47; his wife RITA, 42, and son ROGER, JR., 21, of Newmarket, N.H.
NATHANIEL CARTER, 23, of South Woodstock, N.H.
RICHARD CASPINIUS, 63, and JENNIE CASPINIUS, 60, of Falmouth, Maine.
GORDON CHASE of Lincoln, N.H.
BERTRAND CROTEAU, 32; his wife, EDMAE, 30; daughter DEBRA, 11; and son BERTRAND, JR., 6, of Thornton, N.H.
CAROL DAVIES, 9, and LORETTA DAVIES, 5, of Hampton, N.H.
EVERETT DEMERITT, 30, of Wolcott, Vt.
CAROL DORSAY, 26, of Woodstock, Vt.
JEFFREY GAINES, 2, of Rockport, Maine.
PAULINE GOTCHREAU and DAVID GOTCHREAU, 64, of Putnam, Conn.
CHARLES GROSS, GABY GROSS, 34; and MELANIE GROSS, 4, of Brookline, Mass.
GEORGE KALOCERIS, 28, of Lynn, Mass.
CHARLES KENNISON, 18, of Jefferson, N.H.
ROBERT PROVENCHAL, 31; and daughters, LINDA and SUSAN, of Biddeford, Maine.
JOHN RICHMAN, 12, of Putnam, Conn.
HAROLD ROGERS, 44; his wife FRANCIS, 34; and son DEAN, of Campton, N.H.
GRETA SCHOPE, 33, of Bridgeport, Conn.
JOSEPH VALLIERE, 59, of Methuen, Mass.
BERYL WARREN, 27, and his son PATRICK, 1, of Craftsbury, Vt.
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH LAURENDEAU and daughter LINDA, 3, of South Barre, Vt.
MR. and MRS. JAY WITMER of Roxbury, Mass.
MR. and MRS. MORRIS BLACKBURN of Memphis, Tenn.
A. RICHARD LESLIE of Madison, Ohio.
MR. and MRS. GEORGE BUXTON of Clifton, N.H.

Nashua Telegram New Hamsphire 1967-09-18