My Thoughts: The VW Camper Van

It was a cold and drizzling afternoon back in April along Broadway in downtown Saratoga Springs, NY. My wife and I were in town overnight for a film festival as we darted in an out of the local shops. My wife can never pass up a bookstore and rightfully so. We came upon the Northshire bookstore and immediately went in, spending about an hour browsing. I’ve never been a really big book reader but the older I get I find myself enjoying it more. I’m very selective in what I read but that is part of the enjoyment. Anyway I came across this book “The VW Camper Van” a biography by Mike Harding. It was $7.98 so I figured what the heck. As a car guy I had always been fascinated by the camper van. As a matter of fact I stopped to look at one for sale along route 4 in Woodstock, VT last summer. In all honestly I think it would be neat to have one a trek across the States with it. In 2022 Volkswagen will be releasing a brand new all electric van. Hopefully my 2007 Ford will hold on until then??????

What I loved most about this book was the history and how the Volkswagen Bus all started in the bombed and burned out ruins of postwar Europe. How the camper van culture evolved and is still evolving. I did not realize how popular they still are across the pond. One downside to this book was that I felt the middle portion of this book dragged on a bit and the author was just trying to fill pages. I had to set it down for a bit and read another book in the interim. However the fun soon enough returned and I thoroughly enjoyed the read. Some of the English words made me chuckle as well. You don’t hear the words Bloke or Lorry often here in the United States. It was a fun read and I recommend it if you happen to see it or can get it at your local library.

Cheers!

1969 Volkswagen Bus converted transporter Lake George, NY September 4th 2016. © Joe Geronimo
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Hyde Park New York: FDR

This past Tuesday we made an overnight trip to Hdye Park, New York to visit the home and Presidential Library of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The National Park Service did a wonderful interpretation and the museum, library, home and grounds are just beautiful. One of the highlights in the museum is Franklin’s car complete with hand controls and a cigarette dispenser the would dispense lighted cigarettes. The Depression Era depiction was utterly amazing and sad as well. I personally am fascinated by World War Two history. We also wanted to visit Val-Kill the home of Eleanor Roosevelt but sadly it was closed the days we were there. If history is something that interests you I highly recommend a visit.

FDR's home in Hyde Park, New York.
FDR’s home in Hyde Park, New York.
The library room in FDR's home.
The library room in FDR’s home.
Music room FDR home
Music room FDR home
Dining room FDR home
Dining room FDR home
Eleanor Roosevelt's bedroom
Eleanor Roosevelt’s bedroom
Franklin and Eleanor's bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio
Franklin and Eleanor’s bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio
Franklin's boyhood bedroom
Franklin’s boyhood bedroom
"Birthing Room" where Franklin was born.
“Birthing Room” where Franklin was born.
Sarah Roosevelt's room which was Franklin's mother
Sarah Roosevelt’s room which was Franklin’s mother
In the Presidential Library sits Franklin's desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert oover's and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin's and exactly the originals.
In the Presidential Library sits Franklin’s desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert Hoover’s and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin’s and exactly the originals.
Michael in a depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two
Michael in a depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two
Depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two
Depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two
A Day that will live in infamy. Franklin's original speech originally said "World History" which he crossed out and wrote in "Infamy".
“A Day that will live in infamy” Franklin’s original speech said “World History” which he crossed out and wrote in “Infamy”.
"The Tehran Conference" On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.
“The Tehran Conference” On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.

 

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Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR's death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President's picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers - space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been "struck a physical blow," and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief "But the war's almost over!" A funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York. Funeral at Hyde Park, NY
Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR’s death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President’s picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers – space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been “struck a physical blow,” and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief “But the war’s almost over!” Funeral at Hyde Park, NY
Franklin D. Roosevelt "Funeral Train" along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.
Franklin D. Roosevelt “Funeral Train” along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt’s body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.

 

Postcard of the Week:

Vintage Santa Fe Railway map postcard.
Vintage Santa Fe Railway map postcard.

This weeks “Postcard of the Week” is a vintage linen Santa Fe Railway “Map” postcard which was mailed on September 8th 1944 in Gallup, New Mexico. It appears that “Bob” is in the United States Navy and there was no charge for postage. Here are some Wikipedia facts from September 1944.

September 1944

1: Canadian troops capture Dieppe, France.
2: Allied troops enter Belgium.
3: Brussels is liberated by the British Second Army.
Lyon is liberated by French and American troops.
4: A cease fire takes effect between Finland and the USSR.[1][2][17]
Operation Outward ends.
5: Antwerp is liberated by British 11th Armoured Division and local resistance.
: The uprising in Warsaw continues; Red Army forces are available for relief and reinforcement, but are apparently unable to move without Stalin’s order.
United States III Corps arrives in European Theater.
: The BelgianDutch and Luxembourgish governments in exile sign the London Customs Convention, laying the foundations for the Benelux economic union.
6: The “blackout” is diminished to a “dim-out” as threat of invasion and further bombing seems an unlikely possibility.
Ghent and Liège are liberated by British troops.
8: Ostend is liberated by Canadian troops.
: Soviet troops enter Bulgaria.[2]
: The Belgian government in exile returns to Belgium from London where it has spent the war.
9: The first V-2 rocket lands on London.
Charles de Gaulle forms the Provisional Government of the French Republic in France
: The Fatherland Front of Bulgaria overthrows the national government and declares war on Germany.[1]
10: Luxembourg is liberated by U.S. First Army.
: Two Allied forces meet at Dijon, cutting France in half.
: First Allied troops enter Germany, entering Aachen, a city on the border.
: Dutch railway workers go on strike. The German response results in the Dutch famine of 1944.
11: United States XXI Corps arrives in European Theater.
12: The Second Quebec Conference (codenamed “Octagon”) begins: Roosevelt and Churchill discuss military cooperation in the Pacific and the future of Germany.[18]
13: American troops reach the Siegfried Line, the west wall of Germany’s defence system.

Waves of paratroops land in the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden in September 1944.

14: Soviet Baltic Offensive commences.
15: American Marines land on Peleliu in the Palau Islands; a bloody battle of attrition continues for two and a half months.
16: The Red Army enters Sofia, Bulgaria.
17: Operation Market Garden, the attempted liberation of Arnhem and turning of the German flank begins.
: British and commonwealth forces enter neutral San Marino and engage German forces in a small-scale conflictwhich ends Sept. 20.
18: Brest, France, an important Channel port, falls to the Allies.
: Jüri Uluots proclaims the Government of Estonia headed by Deputy Prime Minister Otto Tief.[19]
19: The Moscow Armistice is signed between the Soviet Union and Finland, bringing the Continuation War to a close.[2]
Nancy liberated by U.S. First Army
20: The Government of Estonia seizes the government buildings of Toompea from the German forces and appeals to the Soviet Union for the independence of Estonia.[19]
: United States XVI Corps arrives in European Theater.
21: British forces take Rimini, Italy.
: The Second Dumbarton Oaks Conference begins: it will set guidelines for the United Nations.
: In Belgium, Charles of Flanders is sworn in as Prince-Regent while a decision is delayed about whether King Leopold III can ever return to his functions after being accused of collaboration.[20]
San Marino declares war on the Axis
: The Government of Estonia prints a few hundred copies of the Riigi Teataja (State Gazette) and is forced to flee under Soviet pressure.[21]
22: The Red Army takes Tallinn, the first Baltic harbour outside the minefields of the Gulf of Finland.
: The Germans surrender at Boulogne.
23: Americans take Ulithi atoll in the Caroline Islands; it is a massive atoll that will later become an important naval base.
24: The Red Army is well into Poland at this time.
25: British troops pull out of Arnhem with the failure of Operation Market Garden. Over 6,000 paratroopers are captured. Hopes of an early end to the war are abandoned.
United States IX Corps arrives in Pacific Theater.
26: There are signs of civil war in Greece as the Communist-controlled National Liberation Front and the British-backed government seem irreconcilable.
30: The German garrison in Calais surrenders to Canadian troops. At one time, Hitler thought it would be the focus of the cross-Channel invasion.

Connecting Our World

Greetings,

I’m not sure if any of you know this but I am a postcard junkie. I have a major addiction to postcards both new and old with the later being my favorite. There is just something about sending and receiving postcards that I truly enjoy. Maybe it’s that mystique of what I might find in my mailbox or that surprise in yours. Whatever it might be I truly enjoy it.

Some of you who are reading this may have been a recipient of one of my postcards from when I/we travel, a friendly hello or just a simple thank you. Yes I know what you are thinking I have to buy stamps and find a Post Office or mailbox when “I can just post a picture on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or whatever is the new fad today”. I’ll be honest, I love your pictures, however I love even more when you take the time to send me something tan·gi·ble “That may be touched, real actual; evident.” Something that years from now I can look back on and re-visit your life, journey, event or day.

A look back to a postcard written in 1958.
A look back to a postcard written in 1958.

One of my favorite stories is of recent, about a woman from our running community, a friend who lives a good distance from our area. While on social media prior to the Christmas holiday I was raving about the local coffee shop and their “Christmas Blend” coffee roast. Katie chimed in with “We are serious coffee drinkers ” asking if I might ship her some, so I did. After a week went by and I heard nothing of her receiving my package. I sent her a message asking if it had arrived and her response to me was “I sent you an old fashioned thank you card in the mail”. It was a handmade card, I was elated!From Katie O'Regan

Lately I have been recieving postcards from all around the globe. Have you ever heard of the Postcrossing project? I have been a member now for just over two years and I love it. I get to send  postcards around the world and even better I receive them from around the world as well. Furthermore I have the added benefit of all different types of stamps from across the globe. Exciting, yes I know!

My friends I hope that you have a happy 2015 and who knows maybe one of my postcards will make it to your mailbox.

Cheers!

Joe

Received from Siberia Russia on January15th 2015.
Received from Siberia Russia on January15th 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Received postcard from Taiwan on December 23rd 2014.
Received postcard from Taiwan on December 23rd 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This postcard came from a friend who was recently on a Caribbean cruise.
This postcard came from a friend who was recently on a Caribbean cruise.

A little information about the “Postcrossing Project” in hopes it might peak your interest. http://www.postcrossing.com

The project

The goal of this project is to allow people to receive postcards from all over the world, for free. Well, almost free! The main idea is that: if you send a postcard, you will receive one back from a random Postcrosser from somewhere in the world.

Why? Because, like the founder, there are lots of people who like to receive real mail.
The element of surprise of receiving postcards from different places in the world (many of which you probably have never heard of) can turn your mailbox into a box of surprises – and who wouldn’t like that?

How does it work?

First, the short version:

  1. request an address from the website
  2. mail the postcard to the address
  3. wait to receive a postcard
  4. register the received postcard in the system

The first step is to request to send a postcard. The website will display (and send you an email) with the address of another member and a Postcard ID (e.g.: US-786). You then mail a postcard to that member.

The member receives the postcard and registers it using the Postcard ID that is on the postcard. At this point, you are eligible to receive a postcard from another user. You are now in line for the next person that requests to send a postcard. Where the postcard comes from is a surprise!

You can have up to 5 postcards traveling at any single time. Every time one of the postcards you send is registered, you can request another address. The number of postcards allowed to travel at any single time goes up the more postcards you send!

V Mail “Victory Mail”

431218 V-Mail Packaging

Introducing V-Mail

Following the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States declared war on Japan and entered the largest full-scale war in history. As war raged around the world, countries divided into Axis and Allied powers and battlefields spanned across Europe, Asia, and Africa. Members of the armed forces were deployed to the far reaches of the globe and were separated from their families.

In a days before email, cell phones, and text messaging, letters served as a vital link between loved ones and friends. Army Post Offices (APOs), Fleet Post Offices (FPOs), and U.S. post offices alike were flooded with mail sent by service members and sweethearts. According to the 1945 Annual Report to the Postmaster General, mail dispatched to the Army in that fiscal year reached 2,533,938,330 pieces compared to the prior year total of 1,482,000,000 and fiscal 1943 sum of only 570,633,000 items. The Navy received 838,644,537 in fiscal year 1945 whereas the prior period saw 463,266,667 mail items sent. The bulk and weight of parcels and letters was competing with military supplies in transport vehicles. Officials from the Post Office, War, and Navy Departments faced a large problem: Was there a way to save room for equipment and still deliver the mail?

Mailing to the frontlines: American soldier finds lost letters near Auw, Germany; February 1945. National Archives (111-SC-200677).
Mailing to the frontlines: American soldier finds lost letters near Auw, Germany; February 1945. National Archives (111-SC-200677).

Operating V-Mail

The Post Office, War, and Navy Departments worked together to ensure V-Mail for civilians and service members around the world. Numerous personnel, expensive pieces of equipment, photographic supplies, ships, and planes were needed to process and deliver V-Mail. The volume of mail and supplies was such that all three departments were needed to keep the network operational and keep the mail moving.

The Post Office Department was responsible for domestic dispatch and handling of mail. The Post Office sorted V-Mail by respective Army and Navy post offices and delivered it to the V-Mail stations in the United States. Postal authorities divided the continental U.S. into three regions and funneled the incoming and outgoing V-Mail to three facilities: New York, San Francisco, and Chicago. At the ports of embarkation the War and Navy Departments took over postal duties and Kodak ran the V-Mail photography operations. The military was responsible for the transportation of mail destined for overseas personnel. Getting V-Mail to and from the field depended upon a network of V-Mail plants at key locations in the European and Pacific theaters.

Technology was the linchpin in this inter-agency, international network. At the center was the Recordak machine that was initially developed by the Eastman Kodak Company for bank records. The microphotography equipment was designed for ease of use and mass production of recorded materials. Great Britain’s Airgraph Service relied on Kodak for shrinking letters onto microfilm for shipment. Following that lead, the U.S. War Department entered into a contract with the Eastman Kodak Company on May 8, 1942 to use Recordak machines to process V-Mail.

Kodak coordinated the photographic operations in the continental U.S. When it came to the far-flung overseas V-Mail stations, the processing was in the hands of the U.S. military. There, staff relied on the Recordak’s straight-forward design and function to process mail quickly. Captain James Hudson, trained by Eastman Kodak Company, operated V-Mail in Cairo, Egypt, described the machine’s actions:

“It accepted a stack of regular size sheets of paper, about 8 x 11, and fed them one at a time through this machine that was about the size of a small chest of drawers, or today’s paper copier. Cleverly, a light scanned the sheet through a narrow, transverse slot and exposed one frame of a 16 mm motion picture film that was synchronized with it, so that one tiny frame had the image of the full sheet of paper. For those days, that was a lot of compression and tremendous synchronization to make it happen. Kodak gets all the credit for that innovation” http://postalmuseum.si.edu/VictoryMail/operating/flipbook_flash.html

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Using V-Mail

V-Mail letter sheets were designed to make the microfilming process easy. The distinguishing marks and uniform size of V-Mail stationery helped workers gather the folded letter sheets for their special processing. All sheets were set to standard dimensions, weight, grain, and layout.

The materials were produced by the Government Printing Office as well as printing and stationery firms that had been issued permits by the Post Office Department. Multiple suppliers were used to get the V-Mail forms to the people quickly.

The Post Office Department provided customers with special stationery for free. Correspondents could obtain two sheets per day from their local post office. Others opted to purchase the materials that were readily available in neighborhood stores.

V-Mail stationery functioned as a letter and envelope in one. Once the sender had completed her message, she put the recipient’s and return addresses at the top and then folded the sheet into a self-mailing piece. This set of addresses was essential to the final stages for delivery because only this side was reproduced from microfilm to photographic print.

The sender repeated addresses a second time on the opposite side of the sheet. This set, on the “envelope” side of the form, was used to carry the mail along its first stage of the journey from a mailbox to a processing center.

You can print out a copy of a blank V-Mail form (http://postalmuseum.si.edu/VictoryMail/images/vmail.pdf) to use as stationery. If you want to mail it, be sure to use first-class postage.

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Letter Writing in World War II

For members of the armed forces the importance of mail during World War II was second only to food. The emotional power of letters was heightened by the fear of loss and the need for communication during times of separation. Messages from a husband, father, or brother, killed in battle might provide the only surviving connection between him and his family. The imminence of danger and the uncertainty of war placed an added emphasis on letter writing. Emotions and feelings that were normally only expressed on special occasions were written regularly to ensure devotion and support.

Military personnel felt the most connected to home through reading about it in letters. Civilians were encouraged to write their service men and women about even the most basic activities. Daily routines, family news, and local gossip kept the armed forces linked to their communities.

Wartime romances adjusted to long distances and sweethearts and spouses separated by oceans used mail to stay in touch. Couples were married on furlough and babies were born while their fathers were away at the battlefront. Letters kept America’s troops informed about home life and detailed accounts allowed them to be in the war and have that critical link back to their families. Others wrote to kindle new relationships and fight off the loneliness and boredom of wartime separation.

Mail played a significant role in maintaining morale on the battlefront and at home, and officials supported that role by working to ensure mail communications during wartime. V-Mail service could ensure this communication with added security and speed. The Office of War Information and the Advertising Council worked with commercial businesses and the community to spread the word about this new service and its benefits.

V-Mail was promoted as patriotic with advertisements emphasizing contributions to the war effort, such as saving cargo space and providing messages to lift spirits. To allay the fears and misconceptions of would-be V-Mail writers, news reports explained how the letters were processed and sped to military personnel.

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Frank Chetko, Photographer Endicott Johnson Shoe Manufacturing Circa 1950

Frank Chetko, 78, of 2177 Lagoon Dr., Dunedin, FL, formerly of 118 Glenwood Ave., Binghamton, NY, went to be with his Lord, Wednesday, August 19, 1987, at his daughter’s home in Johnson City, NY. He was predeceased by his wife, Anna, in 1985. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, Charles and Nancy Chetko, Bridgeport, CT.; two daughters and sons-in-law, Shirley and William Merrall, Dunedin, FL, Roxanne and Paul P. Misata, Johnson City; seven grandchildren; four great grandchildren; a sister, Mary Pigos, Binghamton; also several nieces and nephews. He was a photographer for the Binghamton Sun, the Endicott Johnson Corporation and retired from SUNY-Binghamton. He was a charter member of the National Press Photographer’s Assoc. He was a 50-year member of the Sokol USA and the Honorary Chairman of the Public Relations Department Sokol USA. He was a past president and member of Lodge 36 Sokol USA. He was a member of the Czechoslovakian American Society in St. Petersburg, FL. He was a navy veteran of World War II, a member of the First Ward American Legion, and the DAV Chapter 60. He was an avid athlete, playing baseball for the Triplets, playing semi-professional football and basketball.

http://www.frankchetko.kwikfold.com/index.html

Binghamton Clinton St. Store
Binghamton Clinton St. Store
Factory on Helen Drive, Johnson City,NY, built 1921, named for the successful conclusion of WW I housed West End and Women's Fine McKay operations with a capacity of 22,000 pairs of shoes daily. Bob Blakeslee worked in cutting room of West End in 1951.
Factory on Helen Drive, Johnson City,NY, built 1921, named for the successful conclusion of WW I housed West End and Women’s Fine McKay operations with a capacity of 22,000 pairs of shoes daily. Bob Blakeslee worked in cutting room of West End in 1951.
EJ Security Annex in Endicott,NY. with light-colored IBM facilities in the background.
EJ Security Annex in Endicott,NY. with light-colored IBM facilities in the background.
Endicott Oak Hill Ave. Plant
Endicott Oak Hill Ave. Plant
Infants Factory on Corliss Avenue, Johnson City, NY, built 1916, called the Pioneer Annex by locals. The first two floors were used to produce shipping cartons for the company.
Infants Factory on Corliss Avenue, Johnson City, NY, built 1916, called the Pioneer Annex by locals. The first two floors were used to produce shipping cartons for the company.
C.F.J. Factory (Boys,Youths,& Men's McKay Operations) adjacent to Lester Avenue,J.C., NY built in 1913, named for C.Fred Johnson, brother of George F.Johnson producing up to 24,000 pairs of shoes daily. Cafeteria with porch serving up 2,000 meals intially at 15¢ each, 35¢ in 1951. Victory Factory on left.
C.F.J. Factory (Boys,Youths,& Men’s McKay Operations) adjacent to Lester Avenue,J.C., NY built in 1913, named for C.Fred Johnson, brother of George F.Johnson producing up to 24,000 pairs of shoes daily. Cafeteria with porch serving up 2,000 meals intially at 15¢ each, 35¢ in 1951. Victory Factory on left.
EJ factory complex in Endicott,NY
EJ factory complex in Endicott,NY
EJ Workers Public Market, adjacent to C.F.J. Park, Johnson City, NY, built in 1934 for $120,000 with 40,000 square feet, 200 vendor stalls, and air conditioning replacing the original market, open to everyone 3 days a week. The official name was "John S. Patterson Market", named for the private caterer George F. Johnson paid to start the original market in 1917. The market closed sometime in the mid-50's and was converted to the Zing Factory for manufacturing.
EJ Workers Public Market, adjacent to C.F.J. Park, Johnson City, NY, built in 1934 for $120,000 with 40,000 square feet, 200 vendor stalls, and air conditioning replacing the original market, open to everyone 3 days a week. The official name was “John S. Patterson Market”, named for the private caterer George F. Johnson paid to start the original market in 1917. The market closed sometime in the mid-50’s and was converted to the Zing Factory for manufacturing.
Ranger/Paracord Factory adjacent to C.F.J. Park in Johnson City built in 1944 to produce footwear for the military. Locals referred to the new (and old) Paracord plant as the "rubber mill." C.F.J. Park swimming pool at left of picture. The Pagoda Pump-house can be seen at the left of the photo is the only preserved structure from this entire factory complex which covered about 30 acres. The Gannett printing facility now occupies this site.
Ranger/Paracord Factory adjacent to C.F.J. Park in Johnson City built in 1944 to produce footwear for the military. Locals referred to the new (and old) Paracord plant as the “rubber mill.” C.F.J. Park swimming pool at left of picture. The Pagoda Pump-house can be seen at the left of the photo is the only preserved structure from this entire factory complex which covered about 30 acres. The Gannett printing facility now occupies this site.
Looking West along Lackawanna tracks at Willow Street,Johnson City.Sunrise Factory in center completed in 1929 named to suggest a new day coming in the nation. Sunrise produced the all-rubber boots and overshoes for EJ with a walkway across the tracks to the Jigger Factory at right built in 1926, taking its name from the rubber-soled canvas-topped footwear called "Jiggers. Both factories initially used a common labor force of some 400 employees. In the summer,Sunrise workers produced foot-wear for winter use; in the winter, the same workers moved to the Jigger factory and produced footwear for summer use. Jigger was demolished in February 2012. Light factory at the left was the Fair Play Caramel Company.
Looking West along Lackawanna tracks at Willow Street,Johnson City.Sunrise Factory in center completed in 1929 named to suggest a new day coming in the nation. Sunrise produced the all-rubber boots and overshoes for EJ with a walkway across the tracks to the Jigger Factory at right built in 1926, taking its name from the rubber-soled canvas-topped footwear called “Jiggers. Both factories initially used a common labor force of some 400 employees. In the summer,Sunrise workers produced foot-wear for winter use; in the winter, the same workers moved to the Jigger factory and produced footwear for summer use. Jigger was demolished in February 2012. Light factory at the left was the Fair Play Caramel Company.
Sunrise Factory looking west. All Sports Factory on left partially obscured by smoke from train engine.
Sunrise Factory looking west. All Sports Factory on left partially obscured by smoke from train engine.
C.F.J. Annex (center) in Johnson City, housing the heeling, lining and trimming departments built in 1921.
C.F.J. Annex (center) in Johnson City, housing the heeling, lining and trimming departments built in 1921.
"All Sports Factory" in foreground at Lackawanna Railroad crossing at Baldwin Street, JC, NY built in 1923. Originally called South End Factory, then the Welt Factory. Ice skates and cleated athletic shoes were the most popular products. The Sunrise Factory can be seen on the left.
“All Sports Factory” in foreground at Lackawanna Railroad crossing at Baldwin Street, JC, NY built in 1923. Originally called South End Factory, then the Welt Factory. Ice skates and cleated athletic shoes were the most popular products. The Sunrise Factory can be seen on the left.
Pioneer factory complex at the corner of Willow Street and Corliss Avenue, looking west on Corliss Avenue occupied an entire block. The original factory had a 225 horsepower Corliss steam engine to supply power.
Pioneer factory complex at the corner of Willow Street and Corliss Avenue, looking west on Corliss Avenue occupied an entire block. The original factory had a 225 horsepower Corliss steam engine to supply power.
Endicott Johnson Complex on North Street, Endicott, NY
Endicott Johnson Complex on North Street, Endicott, NY
Nurses Home in Johnson City provided housing for 85 nurses and student nurses at Wilson Memorial Hospital (in background). The facility was given by C. Fred Johnson in memory of his wife.
Nurses Home in Johnson City provided housing for 85 nurses and student nurses at Wilson Memorial Hospital (in background). The facility was given by C. Fred Johnson in memory of his wife.
Chas. S. Wilson Memorial Hospital Annex on Clinton Street, Binghamton, NY
Chas. S. Wilson Memorial Hospital Annex on Clinton Street, Binghamton, NY
Fire Prevention Station No.1 on Avenue B in Johnson City,NY
Fire Prevention Station No.1 on Avenue B in Johnson City,NY
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Any information about the locations of the photographs,
Frank Chetko, or EJ would be appreciated.
Captions by Bob Blakeslee who worked at EJ in the fifties are appreciated.
More of Frank’s photographs are available.

Contact Dennis Dunda (607) 722-4377

Visit http://www.kwikfold.com for trade show displays, photography,
and web site creation.