St. Regis Canoe Area

In early September myself and two other friends went on a canoe camping trip in the St. Regis Canoe Area of  New York’s Adirondack Park. The weather would be perfect with nights dipping into the low 30’s. I loved this adventure and hope you enjoy some of the images from it.

September 8th I left my home in the Southern Tier of New York arriving in Lake Placid, NY 4.5 hours later. Here I would meet my friend Gary with Placid being our home for the night. We would do some paddling in the area, also hitting a few of the local breweries as well.

Early the next morning Gary & I would meet our friend Scott at our starting point “Little Clear Pond” for our adventure. Our canoes loaded and I mean loaded we were off for 4 days/3 nights of adventure.

Once across Little Clear Pond we would have a 1/2 mile canoe carry to St. Regis Pond. Each of us wound up doing a “Double Carry” due to our packs being so heavy. Our goal for this trip would be to hopefully snag the only lean-to on St. Regis Pond. Our hopes would be dashed as it was already occupied. No worries we scouted a great primitive campsite not too far away. We unloaded our gear, setup our site and we were off for a great little pond hopping adventure for the rest of the day.

We would paddle across the 400 acre St. Regis Pond to the 116 meter canoe carry into Green Pond, followed by a 255 meter carry to Little Long Pond, followed by a 315 meter carry to Bear Pond and lastly a 121 meter carry to Bog Pond. I’ve paddled most of these ponds mentioned here before. I love these little ponds, especially Little Long Pond. We would make it back to camp around 5:30 in order to get dinner cooking and the campfire going for the evening. Later that evening we would crack a few beers, peer through the tree canopy as millions of stars shined in the night sky.

Morning came and our first order of business was coffee! Our plan for the day was another pond hopping adventure with one of the carries being 1.4 miles. The day would contrast in many ways. I mean we had periods of sun and light mist. We also battled a little mud especially at the aptly named “Mud Pond” where I sank down to my waist. As my cohorts were laughing I was able to free myself rather quickly. 

My favorite from the day was “Fish Pond”. This pond is remote and takes some getting into. It does have two lean to’s on it and we decided to sit out some of the passing weather at one of them enjoying a hot fire and some lunch.

After spending most of the day paddling and carrying we found ourselves back at camp around 5PM. This seemed like a perfect time to get things in order, cook dinner and relax and watch the day fade into night. 

We were still exhausted the next day from our prior adventure and decided a camp day was just what we needed. We sat around and told tall tales, sipped some whiskey, paddled and even took a nap. We knew this coming night would be cold as overnight temperatures would dip to just around freezing. The night sky was clear and in the distance we could hear the thunder of Vermont’s Air National Guard and their F16’s doing some night training. The Adirondacks see’s a lot of that my guess is because of the low volume of air traffic but I’ve been wrong once or twice in my life.

With silence restored Gary and I sat and watched the Milky Way begin to appear as Scott snored away in his tent. Later we would be awakened by a crashing noise in camp and I thought to myself we have a bear in camp. I sprang up quickly grabbing my headlamp and peered out of my tent. Gary immediately did the same as Scott was sleeping😂. It turned out that we had three skunks checking out or homestead. They quickly dispersed into the woods and we never saw them again. However I had a difficult time getting back to sleep because of the loons and owls that began to jam at 0330. I will admit it was an amazing symphony.

The next morning it was cold and we quickly got the campfire started for some heat as well as coffee. We ate breakfast and chatted about our adventures. Afterwards we would break camp, douse our fire with water, load our boats and begin our journey out. 

Once we were back to our cars with boats loaded and gear packed it was time to hit Raybrook Brew House in Raybrook, NY for a late lunch and a few cold beers. Yeah that hit the spot!

Cheers!

Gary Sharp Lake Placid, NY September 8th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Pond hopping near Lake Placid, NY September 8th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Gary & I pond hopping near Lake Placid, NY September 8th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Loading up our boats at Little Clear Pond near Saranac Lake, NY September 9th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
We just paddled across Little Clear Pond to the 1/2 mile canoe carry to St. Regis Pond September 9th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Scott Ireland walking the plank St. Regis Pond September 9th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
I stepped in a little mud trying to launch at St. Regis Pond September 9th 2020. © Scott Ireland
Scouting campsites on St. Regis Pond September 9th 2020. © Scott Ireland
Coffee & campfires at our site on St. Regis Pond. © Joe Geronimo
We are at the canoe carry from Ochre Pond to Fish Pond which is 1.4 miles. September 10th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Taking a break on Fish Pond September 10th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Checking out the Blagden lean to on Fish Pond September 10th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Mud Pond, need I say more. September 10th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
We’ve just carried from St. Regis Pond to Ochre Pond September 10th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Paddling across the small Ochre Pond September 10th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Friday was camp day on St. Regis Pond. September 11th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Scott Ireland paddling across St. Regis Pond on our way out September 12th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Gary Sharp paddling across St. Regis Pond on our way out September 12th 2020. © Joe Geronimo
Our adventure has come to an end at the Raybrook Brew House in Raybrook, NY.

 

Canoe Camping

Over the past month we’ve had some really beautiful weather along with a few real scorchers thrown in. Back in mid June I had the opportunity to go canoe camping in one of my favorite places in the Adirondacks with my friends Gary and Amy.

Amy had gotten there on Thursday in order to secure a campsite. With the State Campgrounds shutdown the back country sites were filling up fast. She was able to get one of the last two sites on Follensby Clear Pond. Gary arrived early Friday morning and I got to the launch around 12:30 that afternoon.

I’ve read the stories, seen the pictures and dreamed of one day being here myself. My canoe loaded with the hope I didn’t forget anything, the register signed, my map spread out I was off on my 1.75 mile journey to our campsite at the northern end of Follensby.

Once at camp I set up so I would not have to do it in the dark later. Afterwards the three of us did a short paddle and carry over to Green Pond paddling under marshmallow skies above reflecting in crystal clear green waters below.

Back at our campsite and dinner cooking I was really eyeing Amy’s solo canoe. Most of my experience has been with kayaks and pack canoes. So as the fire in the sky flickered I asked Amy if I could take her canoe for a test drive. Amy paddles a 16′ 6″ Wenonah Prism ultra light kevlar that weighs 32#’s. From the first strokes of my paddle I fell In love with it. (I plan on adding this or something similar to my collection come fall)

Later that evening as we sat around the campfire the loons were pretty much at it all night. I retired to my tent around 12:30AM and was woken around 3:30AM just as a chorus of owls had joined the loons, their voices echoing through the stillness. Thankfully I was able to fall back asleep finally stirring around 7:00AM.

Gary was awake and boiling water for his coffee. I walked down to the lake scooped some water fired up my Jetboil and a few minutes later I was relaxing with a hot cup of Joe myself. Not too long after Amy would emerge from her tent as well.

Today’s plan would have us paddling a loop from Follensby Clear Pond to Horseshoe Pond, Little Polliwog Pond, Polliwog Pond and back to Follensby. This would be a very nice relaxing 7.15 mile adventure according to my GPS. We got back to our campsite shortly before a thunderstorm rolled through. Once the stormed blew over we had a wonderful evening again by the fire.

My original plan was to paddle out of camp on Monday morning and make the long drive home then. But it was Sunday morning (Father’s Day) and I was missing my boys. I decided to break camp, paddle out that morning and get home to have dinner as a family and hang with my sons, I made the right decision. Amy and Gary did the same as well.

This was a fun adventure with some great friends. With so many more places to explore I hope to get back there soon.

Cheers!

Getting off the North Way at exit 30 making my way towards the Saranac Lake area. © Joe Geronimo

Rolling along route 73 and Lower Cascade lake. © Joe Geronimo

All signed in at Follensby Clear Pond. @ Joe Geronimo

 

Loaded up and ready to head for camp. © Joe Geronimo

Making my way along Follensby Clear Pond headed for camp. © Joe Geronimo

Arriving at our campsite. © Joe Geronimo

Canoe carry from Follensby Clear Pond to Green Pond. © Joe Geronimo (Check all that pollen on the water)

Marshmallow skies on Green Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Gary, Amy and Amy’s dog Pungo on Green Pond. © Joe Geronimo

At the canoe carry from Green Pond back to Follensby Clear Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Standing at the shore of our campsite the sun begins to set over Follensby Clear Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Paddling Amy’s Wenonah Prism under stunning skies.

Gary takes the Prism for a spin. © Joe Geronimo

The next day Gary setting off for our adventure. © Joe Geronimo

Amy making her way along Follensby Clear for the Horseshoe Pond carry. © Joe Geronimo

At the canoe carry to Horseshoe Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Gary on Horseshoe Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Amy and Pungo paddling on Horseshoe Pond. © Joe Geronimo

My view of Horseshoe Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Gary carrying from Horseshoe Pond to Little Polliwog Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Amy’s turn to carry from Horseshoe Pond to Little Polliwog Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Amy & Gary putting in on Little Polliwog Pond. And yes Little Polliwog lives up to its name. © Joe Geronimo

Gary & Amy Polliwog Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Amy & I exploring Polliwog Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Exploring Polliwog Pond. © Joe Geronimo

Finally the canoe carry from Polliwog Pond back to Follensby Clear Pond.

After the thunderstorm moved out I took another spin in Amy’s Wenonah Prism. © Joe Geronimo

 

If you are interested in purchasing any of these images please fill out the form below, thank you.

 

A Brief Update

It has been a while since I’ve written so I figured I’d give you all a brief update. On May 16th I traveled to the Adirondacks to pick up a new canoe I had made. I purchased a Hornbeck Boats New Tricks, this pack canoe is 14 feet long and weighs 24 pounds.

I cannot express enough how fortunate I feel to own two beautiful canoes handcrafted right here in New York. Some people collect cars, me I have begun to collect canoes. I’m Looking forward to this years adventures, however I’m not sure what they might be as our world is different now and I plan to adapt accordingly.

Paddling Jabe Pond in the Adirondack Park with my brand new Hornbeck Boats “New Tricks” 14′ pack canoe May 16th 2020.

 

Paddling my Adirondack Canoe Company 14′ 24# “Boreas” on Little Colby Pond in Saranac Lake, NY August 2019.

 

 

 

Going to Hell

Last week the weather was spectacular and I would find myself in the Adirondack Park for a few days. I’ve been wanting to visit Helldiver Pond in the Moose River Plains area for quite some time. Mostly because “Harold” the resident bull moose makes his daily morning appearance, sadly Harold is rumored to have passed.

Moose or not I would make the trip to Helldiver Pond. Helldiver is nestled 10 miles in on a dirt road from the DEC sign in off of Limekiln Lake Road in Inlet, NY. Once at the parking area it is a short 1/4 mile carry to the 15 acre pond. I had the place to myself until I noticed a mountain biker show up with a pair of binoculars and scope the place out. I paddled over for a few minutes to chat.

As I have mentioned this pond had been on my to do list for a while. Although I went mooseless I was not disappointed. Autumn had begun to show its true colors.

Cheers!

Helldiver Pond Moose River Plains Inlet, NY September 19th 2019. © Joe Geronimo

Helldiver Pond Moose River Plains Inlet, NY September 19th 2019. © Joe Geronimo

I just finished paddling Helldiver Pond Moose River Plains Inlet, NY September 19th 2019. © Joe Geronimo

This is a Test and Only a Test……….

Whenever I’ve gone backpacking or canoe camping I’ve always used the already dehydrated meals. These are expensive and not always on the healthy side either. So back in January I purchased a small dehydrator for this sole purpose. Today I’m making my first attempt at dehydrating my own.

Today’s test meal is something I call “Sausage vegetable stew”. I put this concoction together yesterday in my crockpot and let it cook all day. Once cooled I put it into the refrigerator over night so all the flavors had a chance to meld. This morning removing the stew from the fridge I scooped it into a colander in the sink. I did this so any excess water can drain off. I then spread the stew onto my dehydration trays and now I sit and wait.

0715: The dehydration begins

1505: The Dehydration stops

I made three 6 ounce servings from this batch. Looking at one of my similar single serve pre-made meals they are 3.5 ounces. After a long day on the trail or canoeing I find that the 3.5 ounce serving doesn’t satisfy.

Stew:

1- pkg Gianelli Italian turkey sausage (6 links)

2- 28oz cans crushed tomatoes

1- 10oz can petite diced tomatoes with green chiles (Mild)

1- 15.5 can Goya black eyed peas

1- 15.5oz Goya small red beans (I rinsed and drained  both cans of beans)

1- 15oz can mixed vegetables

1- 15oz can cut green beans

1- pepper chopped

Half of an onion chopped

2- tbsp minced garlic

Salt, pepper and Italian seasoning to taste….

Combine all ingredients into crockpot except the sausage. Next fill a pot with water and bring to a boil, removing the sausage from the casings while you wait. Once the water is at a boil breakup the sausage as you put it into the water and cook for a few minutes. After sausage is cooked drain it in a colander. Next boil another pot or kettle of water and pour it over the sausage to rinse any residual fat (This is important). Once rinsed you can combine the meat into your crockpot.

I love the Gianelli sausage as it has half the fat and calories (90 calories per link) as pork sausage and it tastes amazing. This meal has a total of 1,875 calories according to all packaging. However caloric value does change during the dehydration process according to what I’ve read.

This recipe is endless with what you can do for your own personal taste. And a special thank you to my buddy Gary who claims he will be the guinea pig.

Cheers!

Putting the stew onto the dehydration trays.

The dehydration begins

The dehydration has ended and the weighing process starts.

Three 6 ounces meals bagged

 

A Whiteface Revisit

July 15th 2015 Michael and I summited Whiteface Mountain in New York’s Adirondack Park. To date it is our only high peak, however we hope to change that this year conquering another.

Our day started out rainy but like they say wait 10 minutes and it will change. We were treated with a glorious day for hiking and once reaching the summit we decided to change things up a bit. Choosing the road more traveled Michael and I hiked down the auto road instead, continuing to drink in those stunning views.

Cheers!

The Last Hurrah

Today I’m billing as the “Last Hurrah” for paddling in the Adirondacks until next year. I was fortunate enough to be able to meet three new friends who share my passion for the park.

We all met at 0930 this morning near Old Forge. Making our introductions, we were off to the put-in just south of Rondaxe lake. Gear unloaded we shuttled our cars to the take out returning shortly there after to begin our adventure. The upper middle branch of the Moose river twists like a snake but is a beautiful scenic and tranquil flat water paddle. There is quite a bit of “Blow Down” along this section adding that little extra to the day’s navigation.

The weather was pretty much perfect with some wind whipping us a round a little but we were mostly sheltered in the low lying river. Early on a flotilla of ducks kept a watchful eye on us making sure we weren’t sketchy characters. There were several sandy beaches along the way and we found a really large one to take a break and have some snacks.

Balsm could be smelt wafting through the air and if the large pines that stood guard along the river bank could talk I’m sure they would tell you that four new friends had a wonderful time.

Cheers,

Getting ready to launch, Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Danielle Wright, Kathy Corey & Jan Fellenz Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Danielle Wright Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Our duck patrol has given us the ok to proceed along the Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Kathy Corey & Jan Fellenz along the Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Danielle Wright & Jan Fellenz along the Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Taking a break along the Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Kathy Corey along the Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Danielle Wright takes in the tranquility of the Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Jan Fellenz & Kathy Corey chatter as they enjoy the afternoon along the Moose river Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo

Our adventure on the Moose river has come to an end at the North St. take out Old Forge, NY October 19th 2017. © Joe Geronimo