Hyde Park New York: FDR

This past Tuesday we made an overnight trip to Hdye Park, New York to visit the home and Presidential Library of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The National Park Service did a wonderful interpretation and the museum, library, home and grounds are just beautiful. One of the highlights in the museum is Franklin’s car complete with hand controls and a cigarette dispenser the would dispense lighted cigarettes. The Depression Era depiction was utterly amazing and sad as well. I personally am fascinated by World War Two history. We also wanted to visit Val-Kill the home of Eleanor Roosevelt but sadly it was closed the days we were there. If history is something that interests you I highly recommend a visit.

FDR's home in Hyde Park, New York.
FDR’s home in Hyde Park, New York.
The library room in FDR's home.
The library room in FDR’s home.
Music room FDR home
Music room FDR home
Dining room FDR home
Dining room FDR home
Eleanor Roosevelt's bedroom
Eleanor Roosevelt’s bedroom
Franklin and Eleanor's bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio
Franklin and Eleanor’s bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio
Franklin's boyhood bedroom
Franklin’s boyhood bedroom
"Birthing Room" where Franklin was born.
“Birthing Room” where Franklin was born.
Sarah Roosevelt's room which was Franklin's mother
Sarah Roosevelt’s room which was Franklin’s mother
In the Presidential Library sits Franklin's desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert oover's and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin's and exactly the originals.
In the Presidential Library sits Franklin’s desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert Hoover’s and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin’s and exactly the originals.
Michael in a depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two
Michael in a depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two
Depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two
Depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two
A Day that will live in infamy. Franklin's original speech originally said "World History" which he crossed out and wrote in "Infamy".
“A Day that will live in infamy” Franklin’s original speech said “World History” which he crossed out and wrote in “Infamy”.
"The Tehran Conference" On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.
“The Tehran Conference” On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.

 

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Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR's death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President's picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers - space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been "struck a physical blow," and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief "But the war's almost over!" A funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York. Funeral at Hyde Park, NY
Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR’s death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President’s picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers – space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been “struck a physical blow,” and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief “But the war’s almost over!” Funeral at Hyde Park, NY
Franklin D. Roosevelt "Funeral Train" along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.
Franklin D. Roosevelt “Funeral Train” along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt’s body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.

 

Day Trip: The Finger Lakes

Our day started early with a trip to the car dealership in Horseheads. I wasn’t happy with the tires that came on our new car so I had them changed. Since we were so close to the Finger Lakes we decided to make an afternoon of it. After leaving the dealership we made our way through Watkins Glen driving route 14 along the west shore of Seneca Lake. We had our stomachs set on lunch at Fox Run Vineyards only to be disappointed when we arrived to find the cafe was closed until April 1st. Starving we decided to hit up Eddie O’Brien’s in Geneva. Once seated I ordered a pint of Climbing Bines pale ale which is located in Penn Yan. For lunch I went with my favorite the “Bacon, Egg & Cheese” burger and Julie had the french dip. The food was wonderful, the company even better and peering out the window a snow squall had enveloped the city of Geneva.

Bacon, Egg & Cheese burger at Eddie O'Brien's in Geneva, NY.
Bacon, Egg & Cheese burger at Eddie O’Brien’s in Geneva, NY.

After lunch we left Geneva and made the short trip to Vintosa Vineyards where we tasted some pretty darn good wine. Departing Vintosa with a bottle of their 2013 Riesling and now driving south on the east side of Seneca Lake we opted to head towards Ithaca. As we got closer to Ithaca a quick stop was made at Taughannock Falls for a glimpse of the 215 foot splendor. https://youtu.be/PY4BeH6b1n8

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Our Ithaca destination was the amazingly awesome Purity Ice Cream.

Brownie Sundae with chocolate peanut butter and vanilla ice cream. Yeah I know awesome!
Brownie Sundae with chocolate peanut butter and vanilla ice cream. Yeah I know awesome!

After ice cream we made our way home where our two teenage boys didn’t disappoint. The house was a mess when we returned.

Here is to our next adventure!

 

Life in Boxes:

I began shooting slide film around 1990 but most of the images I made at this point were mostly captured on print film, something I regret. I didn’t really begin to convert solely to slide film until early 1992 and have been shooting it ever since. I’ll admit that in 2005 I was intrigued by the digital camera and purchased my first DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) camera. I enjoyed it and made some great images with it as well. I loved the instant gratification of viewing the picture immediately. I also liked the fact that outside the camera and flash card there was no additional cost of film purchase and processing. I vowed to never shoot another roll of film again.

That vow would only last about 6 months before I found myself lacking in something I craved the most. A tangible asset. I would go on to own more DSLR camera bodies as well as film bodies. I spent several years arguing the film vs. digital argument only to realize that it all boils down to preference and what your goals are. There is room in my camera bag for both film and digital.

Our world moves at the speed of now and that is why I carry a DSLR with me most of the time. News happens at a moments notice!

A passion of mine is to preserve history and I choose to do my preservation through photography. No matter the subject matter or the camera you use every click of the shutter captures a moment in time, a piece of our history and for me that is most important. Over the past 24 years I have been documenting my career mostly on film but I do have several hundred images made with a digital camera. I have also been documenting our family as well which is 90% slide film and 10% digital. Without an actual physical count I’d have to estimate my family slide collection hovers somewhere near 8,000 images of which only half have been filed. I just received another 216 slides the other day from the holidays.

Another reason I still shoot slide film is because of monetary value. Collectors want originals. I’ve sold older slides from my collection on Ebay for some serious amounts of money. As a matter of fact I know people who do it for a living. They buy slide collections and break them up. This is both sad and fascinating as well. I’ve slowly been acquiring slides that I hope to flip in the near future but only time will tell.

Since Kodak has exited the slide film market entirely there are only several choices left in which to buy it. Agfa Photo has recently restarted its slide film business and I’m glad because I love the stuff compared to Fuji’s. Its comes done to personal choice. Also Kodak does not process film anymore and most film (Print) is either processed in house at local photo labs or stores like Walmart or CVS. Slide film processing is only done at a handful of locations around the United States with the most popular being Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas.

Although those yellow Kodak boxes of joy that came in the mail are no longer I still get excited for those Red, White & Blue boxes from Dwayne’s!

Cheers!!!!!!

Twas the night before Christmas. Agfa CT Precisa 100, ©Joe Geronimo 2015.
Twas the night before Christmas. Agfa CT Precisa 100, ©Joe Geronimo 2015.
Agfa CT Precis 100 Slide Film.
Agfa CT Precis 100 Slide Film.
I just received 6 boxes of slides from Dwayne's Photo shot over the Christmas holiday. ©Joe Geronimo
I just received 6 boxes of slides from Dwayne’s Photo I shot over the Christmas holiday. ©Joe Geronimo

 

Historic Photograph:

I love history, more so if it involves historic photographs. I recently acquired a “Red Border” Kodachrome slide for my collection taken between 1950 and 1955 of the Mt. Washington Cog Railway in Bretton Woods, NH. I did a little research and discovered something I had never known. This particular locomotive was involved in a fatal accident in September 1967 in which 8 people were killed and 74 injured. I’ve taken this trip several times in my 44 years on this earth and each trip was amazing. However I’d be lying if I told you the thought of something going wrong never crossed my mind.

In this winter scene Cog Railway #3 "Agiocochook"  which was built in 1883 by the Manchester Locomotive Works is getting ready for a trip up the 6,289′ Mt. Washington.
In this winter scene Cog Railway #3 “Agiocochook” which was built in 1883 by the Manchester Locomotive Works is getting ready for its trip to the summit of the 6,289′ Mt. Washington.

Here is an account of what happened that fateful September day in 1967.

Mt. Washington, N.H. (AP) — A mountain-climbing
rail excursion car jammed with Sunday sightseers
lost its engine while backing down the historic cog track on 6,288-foot Mt. Washington and leaped into a gorge, killing eight persons and injuring at least 74.
Gov. John W. King, who rushed to the scene, ordered an immediate investigation by state Public Utilities Commission officials. The 98-year-old railroad, a popular tourist attraction on this scenic centerpiece in the White Mountain Presidential range, spans 3 1/2 miles – 3 miles on trestle.

Victims Listed.
State Police identified the victims as:
BEVERLY RICHMOND, 15, Putnam, Conn.
ERIC DAVIES, 7, Hampton, N.H.
MARY FRANK, 38, Warren, Mich.
KENT WOODWORTH, 9, New London, N.H.
SHIRLEY ZORZY, 22, Lynn, Mass.
CHARLES USHER, 55, Dover, N.H.
A 2-year-old child identified only as the “GROSS child of Brookline, Mass.”
An unidentified female was the eighth victim.
At Mary Hitchcock Hospital in Hanover, CHARLES GROSS, 31; his wife GABY, 34, and their 3-year-old daughter MELANIE, of Brookline, Mass., were undergoing treatment today. Their relationship to the dead GROSS child was not determined immediately.
Three passengers on the ill-fated car were in critical condition at the Hanover hospital. They were RICHARD LESLIE, 49, of Madison, Ohio, a skull fracture and other injuries; NORRIS BLACKBURN, 68, of Memphis, Tenn., spine and other injuries, and MRS. MARIE BUXTON, 49, of Clifton, N.J., back injury.
Most of the injured were taken first to the Littleton Hospital, where doctors put a disaster plan into operation and called all available help. Some 25 doctors and about 40 nurses worked through the night.
The injured were rushed over twisting back mountain roads to the hospitals in northern New Hampshire and Vermont.
Teams of rescue workers needed some four hours to bring the injured and the dead to a base station.
It was not immediately determined how many were in the excursion car when it broke free and rolled down 500 feet before soaring from the cog track and crashing.
The accident happened about one-third of the way down the 3 1/2 miles of track along the west side of the 6,288-foot mountain in the center of the Presidential Range of the White Mountains.
The descent is usually made at four miles an hour with the locomotive in front of the one passenger car backing down.

A passenger, Bertrand Croteau, 32, of Thornton said that when the train reached the first switch Sunday “the locomotive began to shake and just fell off the road.”
He said the passenger car began rolling free “and the brakeman tried to put on the brakes. We went about 500 feet and then we went off the tracks.”
He said he was thrown through a window and
“buried under a pile of bodies.”
Ralph Este, a technician at the transmitter on top of the mountain for WMTM-TV of Poland Springs, Maine, said the engine jumped the track at a point where there is a spur track.
He said the passenger car derailed at a shallow curve just before the track plunges down the steepest incline of the railway, a section called Jacob’s Ladder that has a grade angle of 37.41 per cent.
The passenger car was made of aluminum and reportedly was one of the railway’s newer ones.

INJURED ON MT. WASHINGTON.
Mt. Washington, N.H. (AP) — Here is a partial list of persons injured when an excursion train fell off the Cog Railway and into a gorge on Mt. Washington Sunday:
RUSTY AERTSEN, 19, of Bucks County, Pa.
FLOYD BAILEY, 40, his wife LOUISE, 41, and son KENNETH, 12, of New London, N.H.
MR. and MRS. ANTHONY BERTELLI of Haddam, Conn.
ROGER CARDIN, 47; his wife RITA, 42, and son ROGER, JR., 21, of Newmarket, N.H.
NATHANIEL CARTER, 23, of South Woodstock, N.H.
RICHARD CASPINIUS, 63, and JENNIE CASPINIUS, 60, of Falmouth, Maine.
GORDON CHASE of Lincoln, N.H.
BERTRAND CROTEAU, 32; his wife, EDMAE, 30; daughter DEBRA, 11; and son BERTRAND, JR., 6, of Thornton, N.H.
CAROL DAVIES, 9, and LORETTA DAVIES, 5, of Hampton, N.H.
EVERETT DEMERITT, 30, of Wolcott, Vt.
CAROL DORSAY, 26, of Woodstock, Vt.
JEFFREY GAINES, 2, of Rockport, Maine.
PAULINE GOTCHREAU and DAVID GOTCHREAU, 64, of Putnam, Conn.
CHARLES GROSS, GABY GROSS, 34; and MELANIE GROSS, 4, of Brookline, Mass.
GEORGE KALOCERIS, 28, of Lynn, Mass.
CHARLES KENNISON, 18, of Jefferson, N.H.
ROBERT PROVENCHAL, 31; and daughters, LINDA and SUSAN, of Biddeford, Maine.
JOHN RICHMAN, 12, of Putnam, Conn.
HAROLD ROGERS, 44; his wife FRANCIS, 34; and son DEAN, of Campton, N.H.
GRETA SCHOPE, 33, of Bridgeport, Conn.
JOSEPH VALLIERE, 59, of Methuen, Mass.
BERYL WARREN, 27, and his son PATRICK, 1, of Craftsbury, Vt.
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH LAURENDEAU and daughter LINDA, 3, of South Barre, Vt.
MR. and MRS. JAY WITMER of Roxbury, Mass.
MR. and MRS. MORRIS BLACKBURN of Memphis, Tenn.
A. RICHARD LESLIE of Madison, Ohio.
MR. and MRS. GEORGE BUXTON of Clifton, N.H.

Nashua Telegram New Hamsphire 1967-09-18