Props to the Adirondacks

October 2016 I spent a couple days kayaking in the Adirondacks under amazing Autumn skies. While on 7th lake I discovered Payne’s Air Service and was immediately intrigued. I’m not really a big fan of video and I think this was literally the fifth time using the video feature on my DSLR camera, but gave it a go. I only took a few very short clips. I asked my son if he would take them to school for me and merge them together.

The video is a bit bumpy most likely due to the motion of my kayak, however I think it represents the uniqueness of the Adirondacks.

Cheers!

Winter’s Light at The Castle

Reaching to silence my alarm it was time for my Sunday long run. A quick check of the weather and I said forget it. I just wasn’t feeling it and longed to go back to bed. As I pulled the covers up I noticed the the days light peeking from behind the shades of our bedroom. I got backup and peered out the window and thought to myself this might be one heck of a sunrise. I quickly threw on some clothes, grabbed my cameras and was in the car. The windshield completely frosted over I was driving down the road with my head hung out the window just like a dog.

My initial thought was to head over to Hospital Hill in Binghamton and photograph downtown Binghamton as the sunlight illuminated it. I took a few sample images and was not thrilled. I wandered around the old buildings and noticed the light slowly creeping up over the tire tracks frozen in a dusting of snow near “The Castle” and immediately knew that this would be my shot. I fluttered around looking for my vision, patiently waiting for Mother Nature to set up her easel and begin to paint.

Jack Frost was nipping at more than my nose at this point, realizing I had left my parka in the car. No time to go back and get it as the show was about to start. The soft glow of red and orange highlighted the exterior while the widows appeared illuminated  as if there was life inside this lifeless soul.

“The Castle” Binghamton, NY January 8th 2017, © Joe Geronimo.

The Chicago “L”

I made my first visit to the Windy City back in July. My wife and sons have already spent time here before so this was unchartered territory for me. We were staying with family in one of the suburbs of Chicago and rode the Metra into the city the several days we were there. We navigated the city by either walking or riding the subway which is affectionately knows as the “L”. Riding the “L” opened up a whole new perspective on photography for me. I instantly fell in love with the intricate infrastructure cramped between towering buildings, parking garages and everyday life below. The photographic possibilities are endless and all you need is time.

Prior to my arrival in Chicago I had done absolutely no research on this gem so I was totally in the dark as to the “Prime” locations in which to photograph. The day I made the most of my images started off bright and sunny with weather conditions crumbling like an old building as the day progressed. I believe I have created several images that convey mood, as most of these were grab shots. I particularly like the ones where I was shooting out the front window as we rode the “L”. I shot color slide film but really liked them even more converted to black & white.

The other day I had mentioned to my wife how we need to return so I can spend a good 3-4 days photographing the “L” now that I have done my research.

Cheers!

Waiting at the interlocking of Lake 7 Wells on the Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Lighting conditions were horrid and I was down to 1/60th @ F2.8, but I love the mood of this image. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
Waiting at the interlocking of Lake & Wells on the Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Lighting conditions were horrid and I was down to 1/60th @ F2.8, but I love the mood of this image. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo.
The Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo.
The Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. You can notice walking ahead is Julie, Michael & Max. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. You can notice walking ahead is Julie, Michael & Max. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo

 

The Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago "L" at Lake & Wells July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo. I would later discover that this is one of the most photographed sections due to its intricate design and track work here. I recently bid on a 1982 Kodachrome form this location and lost as it sold for $41.00.
The Chicago “L” at Lake & Wells July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo. I would later discover that this is one of the most photographed sections due to its intricate design and track work here. I recently bid on a 1982 Kodachrome from this location and lost as it sold for $41.00.
Adams & Wabash station Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
Adams & Wabash station Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo

 

The Chicago "L" July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo
The Chicago “L” July 15th 2016. Agfa CT Precisa 100 Slide Film, © Joe Geronimo

Here you’ll find a link to an image from Lake & Wells on the Chicago “L”. It was photographed from either a parking garage or rooftop. However it gives you the perspective of its complexity. I love it! https://flic.kr/p/rUyXih

Bicentennial Barns: Madison County NY

I’m a huge fan of Bicentennial barns painted by Scott Hagan “http://barnartist.com” of Ohio. From 1997 to September 2002, the Ohio Bicentennial Committee commissioned artist Scott Hagan of Belmont County to paint a barn in each county with the committee’s logo and colors. Nearly 2,000 barn owners volunteered their barns to be painted. In the end, Hagan painted 101 barns freehand, including one in each county. One was destroyed by a tornado shortly after its painting and was replaced. The barn painting program was conceived as a cost-effective way to advertise: each barn cost $1,500 to paint, about $500 less than the rent for a billboard. The painted barns celebrated the state’s 200th anniversary in 2003. By 2013, many of the painted barns had faded or been repainted or torn down. Hagan went on to paint barn advertisements across the country.

Between 2004-2006 16 barns were painted with the Madison County Bicentennial Logo by Hagan. In 2006 Madison County celebrated its Bicentennial. There are 15 barns one in each of the Counties towns and the city of Oneida. Bicentennial barns give people the chance to witness the work of a master and curator of a lost American art form.

On August 20th while traveling in Madison County I had the the opportunity to photograph 4 of the 16 barns. My plan is to photograph the remaining barns over the next year or so.

Cheers!

Madison County Bicentennial barn 3232 Route-13 Cazenovia, NY August 20t 2016. ©Joe Geronimo
Madison County Bicentennial barn 3232 Route-13 Cazenovia, NY August 20t 2016. ©Joe Geronimo
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Madison County Bicentennial Barn East Lake Road DeRuyter, NY August 20th 2016. © Joe Geronimo
madison-county-ny-bicentennial-barn-route-20-eaton-ny-august-20th-2016_s
Madison County Bicentennial barn Route 20 Eaton, NY August 20th 2016. ©Joe Geronimo
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Madison County Bicentennial barn Route 12B Madison, NY August 20th 2016. This barn is enormous! ©Joe Geronimo
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Madison County Bicentennial barn Route 12B Madison, NY August 20th 2016. This barn is enormous! ©Joe Geronimo

Postcards from the Road

We recently have just come off our summer vacation. I think this was one of my favorite vacations to date. We rarely get the opportunity to visit with Julie’s family as they live far away. Rather than blah, blah, blah about what we did while on vacation I’m going with a different approach. I think you’ll be able to travel right along with us via postcards from our 2,737 mile journey. So buckle up and enjoy the ride!

Cheers………..

July 10th-13th:

And we didn't even shoot our eye out!
And we didn’t even shoot our eye out!

Postcard Toledo

July 13th-16th:

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July 16th-20th:

24538872832_51fbd91d78_z 28010469824_095cac45ab_z 28395692982_d8ddd19c88_z 28441036461_9e7423d045_z 28469926336_4ae6d41b2a_z 28501787605_407022e30b_z 28520187776_7090c67735_z 28662661055_81472ddeca_z 28662665525_7102e2a446_z Postcard Round Island Lighthouse

July 20th-21st:

Postcard Bronners Postcard Toledo

Imperfection

Sunset Tupper Lake, NY September 24th 2015. Image © Joe Geronimo
Sunset Tupper Lake, NY September 24th 2015, Image © Joe Geronimo.

On a recent morning before going to work I was reminiscing in my mind of a trip to the Adirondacks I had taken not to long ago. The trip was a memorable one to say the least. Fresh in my mind was the vivid sunset I had laid witness to while in Tupper Lake, NY that evening. I’d have to say it was one of the most breath taking I’ve seen in my lifetime.

I was fortunate to be able to make several images of that sunset during its many stages. However one image in particular I never really liked so it never made it to the editing process. Over the past several days that particular image has grown on me and I’ve found myself going back to look at it repeatedly. I finally realized what it is I have come to love about that image. Its not perfect, and neither am I or anyone else for that matter. It reinforces to me that even though we as humans are not perfect there is something to love about everyone.

Cheers!

 

Hyde Park New York: FDR

This past Tuesday we made an overnight trip to Hdye Park, New York to visit the home and Presidential Library of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The National Park Service did a wonderful interpretation and the museum, library, home and grounds are just beautiful. One of the highlights in the museum is Franklin’s car complete with hand controls and a cigarette dispenser the would dispense lighted cigarettes. The Depression Era depiction was utterly amazing and sad as well. I personally am fascinated by World War Two history. We also wanted to visit Val-Kill the home of Eleanor Roosevelt but sadly it was closed the days we were there. If history is something that interests you I highly recommend a visit.

FDR's home in Hyde Park, New York.
FDR’s home in Hyde Park, New York.
The library room in FDR's home.
The library room in FDR’s home.
Music room FDR home
Music room FDR home
Dining room FDR home
Dining room FDR home
Eleanor Roosevelt's bedroom
Eleanor Roosevelt’s bedroom
Franklin and Eleanor's bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio
Franklin and Eleanor’s bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio
Franklin's boyhood bedroom
Franklin’s boyhood bedroom
"Birthing Room" where Franklin was born.
“Birthing Room” where Franklin was born.
Sarah Roosevelt's room which was Franklin's mother
Sarah Roosevelt’s room which was Franklin’s mother
In the Presidential Library sits Franklin's desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert oover's and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin's and exactly the originals.
In the Presidential Library sits Franklin’s desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert Hoover’s and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin’s and exactly the originals.
Michael in a depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two
Michael in a depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two
Depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two
Depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two
A Day that will live in infamy. Franklin's original speech originally said "World History" which he crossed out and wrote in "Infamy".
“A Day that will live in infamy” Franklin’s original speech said “World History” which he crossed out and wrote in “Infamy”.
"The Tehran Conference" On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.
“The Tehran Conference” On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.

 

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Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR's death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President's picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers - space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been "struck a physical blow," and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief "But the war's almost over!" A funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York. Funeral at Hyde Park, NY
Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR’s death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President’s picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers – space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been “struck a physical blow,” and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief “But the war’s almost over!” Funeral at Hyde Park, NY
Franklin D. Roosevelt "Funeral Train" along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.
Franklin D. Roosevelt “Funeral Train” along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt’s body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.