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This past Tuesday we made an overnight trip to Hdye Park, New York to visit the home and Presidential Library of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The National Park Service did a wonderful interpretation and the museum, library, home and grounds are just beautiful. One of the highlights in the museum is Franklin’s car complete with hand controls and a cigarette dispenser the would dispense lighted cigarettes. The Depression Era depiction was utterly amazing and sad as well. I personally am fascinated by World War Two history. We also wanted to visit Val-Kill the home of Eleanor Roosevelt but sadly it was closed the days we were there. If history is something that interests you I highly recommend a visit.

FDR's home in Hyde Park, New York.

FDR’s home in Hyde Park, New York.

The library room in FDR's home.

The library room in FDR’s home.

Music room FDR home

Music room FDR home

Dining room FDR home

Dining room FDR home

Eleanor Roosevelt's bedroom

Eleanor Roosevelt’s bedroom

Franklin and Eleanor's bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio

Franklin and Eleanor’s bedroom until Franklin was stricken with polio

Franklin's boyhood bedroom

Franklin’s boyhood bedroom

"Birthing Room" where Franklin was born.

“Birthing Room” where Franklin was born.

Sarah Roosevelt's room which was Franklin's mother

Sarah Roosevelt’s room which was Franklin’s mother

In the Presidential Library sits Franklin's desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert oover's and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin's and exactly the originals.

In the Presidential Library sits Franklin’s desk from the Oval Office. The desk was Herbert Hoover’s and Franklin never changed the furnishings once taking office. However the trinkets on the desk are Franklin’s and exactly the originals.

Michael in a depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two

Michael in a depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two

Depiction of a top secret "Map Room" during World War Two

Depiction of a top secret “Map Room” during World War Two

A Day that will live in infamy. Franklin's original speech originally said "World History" which he crossed out and wrote in "Infamy".

“A Day that will live in infamy” Franklin’s original speech said “World History” which he crossed out and wrote in “Infamy”.

"The Tehran Conference" On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.

“The Tehran Conference” On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt joins British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin at a conference in Iran to discuss strategies for winning World War II and potential terms for a peace settlement.

 

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Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR's death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President's picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers - space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been "struck a physical blow," and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief "But the war's almost over!" A funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York. Funeral at Hyde Park, NY

Franklin D. Roosevelt died on April 12th 1945. The news of FDR’s death so moved Stalin that he allowed the story and the President’s picture to be printed on the front pages of the Russian newspapers – space previously reserved only for national stories. Winston Churchill said he felt as though he had been “struck a physical blow,” and broke down when he relayed the news in a speech to the House of Commons. A soldier aboard a troopship bound for France exclaimed in disbelief “But the war’s almost over!” Funeral at Hyde Park, NY

Franklin D. Roosevelt "Funeral Train" along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt's body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.

Franklin D. Roosevelt “Funeral Train” along the Hudson River. The funeral train slowly brought Roosevelt’s body from Warm Springs to Washington. Although copper was rationed as part of the war effort, a copper-lined coffin was built for his interment. After the funeral ceremonies his body was again placed on the train for a last ride to his home in Hyde Park, New York.

 

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